Monday, 18 March 2019

Mount St Helens 2004 - 2008, time lapse

Mount St Helens 2004 - 2008, Time Lapse 

Watch the lava domes of Mount Saint Helens grow and collapse.



Saturday, 16 March 2019

18th to 24th March 2019


NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

18th to 24th March 2019

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.


MONDAY 18TH

Course - The Geology of Eruptions, Earthquakes and Tsunamis
When
Mon, 18 March, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Geology of Eruptions, Earthquakes and Tsunamis  
Three of the most devastating natural disaster-forming events are geological, all related to plate tectonics, and are very difficult, if not impossible, to accurately forecast.  What are the causes of these events and their various manifestations? Why are some more dangerous than others? How can we prevent or mitigate these effects? Examples of some of these phenomena will be used to illustrate these points Monday 7th for 10 weeks (not 18h Feb) until 18th March. Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays . Cost £75

Contact Dave Green by email at davegeostudies@gmail.com, by phone at 01594 960858 and by post at Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Lydbrook, Gloucestershire, GL17 9QU

Tuesday 19th

SMFS Evening Meeting
When
Tue, 19 March, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Friends' Meeting House, 1A, Ordnance Rd, Southampton. SO15 2AZ (map)
Description
“European Jurassic to Early Cretaceous non-marine molluscs and palaeoenvironments”,
presentation by Dr Martin Munt, Curator & General Manager, Dinosaur Isle.

Members’ Display Table: Isle of Wight Minerals & Fossils

Details at http://www.sotonminfoss.org.uk/smfsprog.htm

wednesday 20th

SGMRG - AGM and Lecture
When
Wed, 20 March, 19:30 – 21:00
Where
The Miners Institute, BS36 2QB Badminton Rd, Coalpit Heath, Bristol (map)
Description
AGM & Talk 2 - Underground Bristol by Hamish Orr-Ewing

Thursday 21st

Course - Advances in Understanding Earth’s Structure and Operation
When
Thu, 21 March, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury. (map)
Description
Advances in Understanding Earth’s Structure and Operation. 
This 10 week course aims to introduce you to relatively new ideas, some accepted, some controversial, about the internal structure and tectonics of the Earth. Many ideas have changed radically since the inception of the Plate Tectonic hypothesis, and especially in the period from the 1990s, partly as a result of new technology, and the re-examination of parts of the theory that evidence did not support. Each week we will examine a different topic, such as subduction, mantle dynamics, mantle plumes.   Held at The Chantry, Thornbury.  First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 10th January until March 21st (not Thurs 21st Feb). Cost £75

Contact Dave by email at davegeostudies@gmail.com, by phone at 01594 960858 and by post at Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Lydbrook, Gloucestershire, GL17 9QU

Friday 22nd



Saturday 23rd

SWGA - AGM and Lecture
When
Sat, 23 March, 10:30 – 12:00
Where
Lectures at Cardiff University are held in the Department of Earth Sciences in the ‘Main Building’. We meet in the Earth Sciences staff room on Floor 1 and lectures are held in Lecture Theatre 1.25. (map)
Description

(Cardiff): AGM and Archaeopteryx: the story of an iconic fossil: Cindy Howells (NMW)


Click here to see the building location on a map from Cardiff University. It is numbered 5 in the key.

All meetings commence at 11.00am except for the AGM which begins at 10.30am.
Refreshments are served from about 45 minutes before each meeting. We take the speaker
to lunch after the meeting and all members are very welcome to join us.
---------------------------------------

DGAG Excursion - Purbeck Stone
When
Sat, 23 March, 10:30 – 10:30
Where
Dorset (map)
Description
Visit to a Purbeck quarry and, in the afternoon, its locality. Details to be confirmed. 

Sunday 24th

Field Trip – Worbarrow Bay
When
Sun, 24 March, 10:00 – 15:00
Where
Worbarrow Bay, Dorset (map)
Description
Further details from the Field Trip Secretary.
Low tide at 13:50
---------------------------------------------

OUGS Severnside - Field Trip
When
Sun, 24 March, 10:30 – 11:00
Where
Start location: Car park at the Windmill Inn, Nore Road. Grid ref. ST 458 766. (map)
Description
The Coastal Geology of Portishead


Leader: Mark Howson FGS

Location: Portishead, North Somerset

Date: March 24th 2019 (Sunday)

Type: Field Trip (Day)

Summary: This is our annual Introductory Day and will be particularly suitable for those with little or no previous experience of geological field trips.

More info:
The trip will be led by Mark Howson FGS, and during the day we will investigate the geology along the seafront at Portishead. This is our annual Introductory Day and will be particularly suitable for those with little or no previous experience of geological field trips, although those with more experience will still find plenty of interesting geology in this area. Amongst other things we will see folding, unconformities and fossils. The overall route will cover a total distance of around 4 miles (6.5 kilometres).

Start time: 10:30 am

Start location: Car park at the Windmill Inn, Nore Road. Grid ref. ST 458 766.

Parking: While there is parking at the Windmill Inn, it can get congested.  Also for convenience at lunch time and your return walk, it is recommended to park on The Esplanade (ST 463 771), and then walk south up Beach Road West for 70 m.  Then turn right to cross the Picnic Grounds to the Windmill Inn car park.

Bring a packed lunch and enjoy the Lake Grounds, or eat at local cafés (Lakeside Café or Lido Café). There are public toilets in Lake Grounds, and toilets in local cafés.

We will be walking on beaches that are mainly pebbly, but in places rocky or muddy and uneven, so you must come with stout footwear and suitable clothing.  Be prepared for a small amount of clambering over or around rocks.

Please bring a hand lens if you have one. A hard hat is only necessary if you wish to approach the higher cliffs for a close-up view of the rock faces.

Contact: Norman Nimmo-Smith   [nrnsmith@hotmail.com]


Friday, 15 March 2019

Want to be the author of a geology book?

Author Sought

I have received the following from Alison Brown, Commissioning Editor for the Crowood Press:-

Dear Mr Churchard,
 

Please allow me to introduce myself as the Commissioning Editor at The Crowood Press with responsibility for the geology list of books.  We publish the best-selling book ‘ The Geology of Britain – An Introduction’ by Peter Toghill.

We are looking to commission some new regional geology titles for the list and one of these is ‘Geology of the West Country’.

 
I note that you have a blog ‘Geology in the West Country’ and so I wondered if you might possibly be able to suggest some suitable people for me to approach to write this.

 
We are looking for 40,000-50,000 words and 150-250 illustrations/photographs. The target audience is people with an interest in geology, including undergraduates, but we would not target the book specifically at the academic market.

I am happy to work with any potential authors to develop the scope of the content.

I would be very grateful for any assistance you could provide.

Yours sincerely

Alison

-------------------------------------------------

A visit to their web site shows that they have published lots of books including geological ones.

If you are interested contact them directly mentioning this blog. And let me know how you got on!

Saturday, 9 March 2019

11th to 17th March 2019


NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

11th to 17th March 2019

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.


MONDAY 11TH

Course - The Geology of Eruptions, Earthquakes and Tsunamis
When
Mon, 11 March, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Geology of Eruptions, Earthquakes and Tsunamis  
Three of the most devastating natural disaster-forming events are geological, all related to plate tectonics, and are very difficult, if not impossible, to accurately forecast.  What are the causes of these events and their various manifestations? Why are some more dangerous than others? How can we prevent or mitigate these effects? Examples of some of these phenomena will be used to illustrate these points Monday 7th for 10 weeks (not 18h Feb) until 18th March. Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays . Cost £75

Contact Dave Green by email at davegeostudies@gmail.com, by phone at 01594 960858 and by post at Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Lydbrook, Gloucestershire, GL17 9QU

Tuesday 12th

Cardiff University Lecture - When Sea levels Change...
When
Tue, 12 March, 18:30 – 20:00
Where
The 2018-2019 monthly Tuesday evening lectures in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences will be held in the Wallace Lecture Theatre (0.13), Main Building, Cardiff University, Park Place, CF10 3AT. Lectures begin at 18.30. Booking is not needed. (map)
Description
Neanderthal landscapes of the Channel River Valley—title tbc
Rebecca Scott (British Museum)
-----------------------------------

WEGA Lecture - Brian Williams, Snowball Earth
When
Tue, 12 March, 19:30 – 21:00
Description
Professor Brian Williams (Cork University)
Snowball Earth

Wednesday 13th

DGAG Lecture - The Cretaceous–Paleogene unconformity in England
When
Wed, 13 March, 19:00 – 21:00
Where
Dorset County Hall, Colliton Park, Dorchester, Dorset, DT1 1XJ, United Kingdom (map)
Description
Uplift and erosion related to the Icelandic mantle plume. 
Talk by Professor Andy Gale. 
This is the third of a series of Earth Science-based lectures organised by DGAG in collaboration with other groups. 
As the Dorset County Museum is closed for refurbishment, ’til summer 2020,  the lectures will take place in Committee Room 1 at County Hall. They will follow the familiar pattern of being on the second Wednesday of the month starting at 7 pm. 
Parking is available behind County Hall and is free in the evening. 

thursday 14th

Course - Advances in Understanding Earth’s Structure and Operation
When
Thu, 14 March, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury. (map)
Description
Advances in Understanding Earth’s Structure and Operation. 
This 10 week course aims to introduce you to relatively new ideas, some accepted, some controversial, about the internal structure and tectonics of the Earth. Many ideas have changed radically since the inception of the Plate Tectonic hypothesis, and especially in the period from the 1990s, partly as a result of new technology, and the re-examination of parts of the theory that evidence did not support. Each week we will examine a different topic, such as subduction, mantle dynamics, mantle plumes.   Held at The Chantry, Thornbury.  First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 10th January until March 21st (not Thurs 21st Feb). Cost £75

Contact Dave by email at davegeostudies@gmail.com, by phone at 01594 960858 and by post at Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Lydbrook, Gloucestershire, GL17 9QU

friday 15th



saturday 16th

Visit to see the fossil collections of Wolfgang Grulke & Dr John Whicher.
When
Sat, 16 March, 10:00 – 16:00
Where
Dorset (map)
Description
Further details from the Chairman - Phil james

sunday 17th




Down to Earth Extra - March 2019

Down to Earth Extra - March 2019

You can get the latest edition HERE. Sorry I am a little late with this but I have been away.


Sunday, 3 March 2019

Florping and blorping

Counting Small Objects in the Kuiper Belt, and What it Means

Pluto is in the Kuiper Belt and is the largest object in the belt. We know of a few thousand more ranging in size down to several tens of kilometres in size. But smaller objects are too faint to see with telescopes.

So, how to estimate how many small objects are there in the Kuiper Belt?

THIS PAPER describes an ingenious way of doing this. Count and measure the size of craters on Pluto and its moon, Charon.

Flyby images allow craters as small as 1.4km to be mapped. Those must have been made by impacts of Kuiper Belt objects not much bigger than 100 metres in size.

Crater sizes down to 13km (produced by objects about 1 to 2km in size) have a distribution which matches expectations. But smaller craters are much less abundant than expected. So a dearth of smaller Kuiper Belt objects.

Kuiper belt object 2014 MU₆₉. The two-lobed object is about 30km from end to end. NASA/Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute, National Optical Astronomy Observatory

The object photographed is better known as Ultima Thule. And close examination of the photo suggest a reason for the lack of smaller objects in the Kuiper Belt.

Each of the lobes seems to be formed of component parts that merged vigorously enough to squish together into an approximate sphere, but with insufficient violence to smash each other apart. This has been called "BLORPING". "FLOMPING" describes the coming together when two lobes meet without causing any deformation.

Because the Kuiper Belt is so far from the sun, orbital speeds are slower, and therefore collisions would be less violent. Instead of falling apart the small objects would tend to amalgamate - and thus the lack of smaller impact craters on Pluto is explained.

There is more in this article than I have written about - it is well worth reading!


Charnwood with Nick Chidlaw

Precambrian Geology at Charnwood Forest, Leicestershire.

Nick Chidlaw has asked me to publicise this course. We are very happy to oblige!

Charnwood Old Cliffe Hill Quarry - buried landscape

Lifelong Learning 4 day course

Precambrian Geology at Charnwood Forest, Leicestershire 

Tutor: Dr Nick Chidlaw
Saturday 22nd – Tuesday 25th June 2019
10.00 am – 5.00 pm each day
In the eastern English Midlands, the generally subdued relief is conspicuously interrupted by the craggy, locally—wooded hills of Charnwood Forest, a few miles north-west of Leicester. Here are found rocks formed from explosive volcanic eruptions about 600 million years ago, together with lavas and igneous intrusions. Within rocks that were once volcanic ashes have been found world-famous fossil sea pens and jellyfish, predating the earliest known shelly fossils.
Attached photograph is of Old Cliffe Hill Quarry, where the South Charnwood Diorites are worked for aggregate. Here, the Diorites are intruded into the Bradgate Formation, both formed in the Ediacaran Period. A late Triassic desert land surface is preserved in profile, overlain by the Mercia Mudstone Group. 
No prior knowledge of geology or the area is assumed. Attendees arrange their own travel, meals and accommodation – tutor can advise.
Meeting location provided to those enrolled. The course is organised through Cardiff University. It carries assessment, which is very difficult to fail! Attendees usually find assessment on these courses useful for consolidating what they have learned.
Tuition fee is £165.00 (concessionary fee available £ 132.00)

Enrolments can be found by ‘phoning 029 2087 0000 or visiting website www.cardiff.ac.uk/learn

For more information on the course, contact tutor nickchidlaw@gmail.com