Saturday, 8 July 2017

Next 3 weeks 10th to 30th July 2017

NEXT 3 WEEKS EVENTS

 10th to 30th July 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday 10th

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 10 July, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 11 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Description Penyard Park, the Coughton Meander, and the strange Weston “hollows” Penyard Park represents the furthest extent northwards of the outcrop of the Quartz Conglomerate, the extremely resistant rock that forms the outer ramparts of the Forest of Dean. It has been isolated from the main outcrop (on Howle Hill) by a large valley with a strangely small “misfit” stream (the Coughton Valley)which is thought to be one part of a large meander of the River Wye, now abandoned like a huge ox-bow.We will climb to the top of the hill to see the evidence for this, and the reason for the existence of the hill. Meet at the rough (Church) car park just to the east of the Church in Weston under Penyard SO 632 232


Wednesday




Thursday




Friday

19:00
 Cheltenham MGS Lecture - Minerals of the Malvern Hills
WhenFri, 14 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereShurdington at The Century Hall (map)
DescriptionAdrian Wyatt Minerals of the Malvern Hills


Saturday




Sunday

OUGS Wessex - Day Trip "Climate and environmental change in the Cretaceous"
WhenSunday, 16 Jul 2017
WhereWorbarrow Bay, Dorset (map)
DescriptionClimate and environmental change in the Cretaceous - Jeremy Cranmer An opportunity to see evidence of climate and environmental change in the Cretaceous at Worbarrow Bay, Dorset Jeremy Cranmer is an amateur geologist who lives in West Dorset very near to the Jurassic Coast. He is OUGS Wessex Branch day trips organizer. By starting at the summit of the Purbeck Hills we shall gain an overview of the geology of the valley we are about to visit so that we can understand how the landscape has been developed by the underlying geology. We shall then visit the coast at Worbarrow Bay which crops-cuts this valley to follow the Cretaceous succession through its various climate and sea level changes between the Portland Stone and the Chalk. Jeremy says "I have never visited this location without noticing something new.” This expedition should be of particular interest to OU students studying environmental science as well as geologists. Please contact the organiser of this event for booking information. Jeremy Cranmer [wessexdaytrips@ougs.org]


Monday 17th




Tuesday

18:00
 Geol Soc Lecture - The ground beneath our feet - Redcliffe Sandstone revisited
WhenTue, 18 July, 18:00 – 19:00
WhereThe Hub, Aztec West (map)
DescriptionAlan Cattell, Structural Soils Ltd The ground beneath our feet - Redcliffe Sandstone revisited

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 18 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Description The Ledbury Hills The Ledbury hills, although not as striking as their near neighbours, the Malverns, were formed as a result of the same set of earth movements, by folding of the Silurian rocks (approx 420 million years) from which they have since been carved. The rocks have varying resistance to erosion, forming ridges and valleys on an intimate scale, which are repeated by the effect of folding. A truly beautiful landscape. Highly fossiliferous limestones and mudstones Meet at the laneside around the church and school at Eastnor GR SO 733 373


Wednesday




Thursday

19:30
 Thornbury Geology Group meeting
WhenThu, 20 July, 19:30 – 20:30
Description Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882 The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee


Friday




Saturday




Sunday

SWGA Field Trip - Manorbier, Pembrokeshire, Leader: Sid Howells
WhenSunday, 23 Jul 2017
WhereMeet at 10:00 am at the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park car park below Manorbier Castle (SS 063 977) (map)
Description Manorbier, Pembrokeshire, Leader: Sid Howells


Monday 24th

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 24 July, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318


Tuesday




Wednesday




Thursday




Friday




Saturday




Sunday 30th





Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Chicken in Aspic - Cretaceous Style

Baby Bird found in Amber

The Guardian reports HERE on a hatchling Enantiorthine bird found in amber in Burma. For a newspaper it is a remarkably detailed report and well worth reading. I won't write more as the article does it better than I can!


And HERE are some Chicken in Aspic recipes

Dark clouds; silver linings

Geological Insights from Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370

Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 disappeared on the 8th March 2014. The search for any remains was concentrated in the Indian Ocean, west of Australia. A by-product of the search is state-of-the-art maps of the ocean floor.

This article gives a good introduction to what was found (no aircraft bits, unfortunately) and contrast it with our previous knowledge.

3-D image showing the diamantina Escarpment, looking northwest (upslope). The largest seamount in this area, about 1.5 kilometers high, appears in the foreground. In the middle and background, the escarpment and trough mark the northern margin of the rift. Vertical exaggeration is 3 times. Credit: Kim Picard and Jonah Sullivan.

The differences in resolution between multibeam and satellite-derived bathymetry data for the northern flank of Broken Ridge are apparent here. Numerous mass wasting features are evident, including slides and debris flows (delineated by their head scarps) that crosscut and run out as debris fans into the large semicircular depression

Friday, 30 June 2017

Next week 3rd to 9th July 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 3rd to 9th July 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday
Stroud Museum - Ichthyosaur Exhibition
When23 May – 9 Jul 2017
WhereGeology Gallery, Museum in the Park, Stratford Park, Stratford Road, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 4AF. (map)
DescriptionExhibition: The Watery World of the Ichthyosaur Tuesday 23 May - Sunday 9 July | Admission Free A mini exhibition in the Geology Gallery Taking our very own fossil baby Ichthyosaur, freshly cleaned and conserved, as its centrepiece, this temporary display will allow you to explore the underwater environment that this creature lived in. Discover what an Ichthyosaur ate for lunch, as well as the other creatures and plant life that shared its watery world. With artistic representations of how the Ichthyosaur lived around 190 million years ago, plus the fossilised remains of the Ichthyosaur and its contemporaries this exhibition is not to be missed. Supported by the The Curry Fund of the Geologists Association

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 3 July, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
When4 – 5 Jul 2017
WhereTBA (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Field Trip 4th or 5th July Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 4 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Ashleworth, Staunton and Corse Lawn
This area, in the subdued topography of the Severn Vale to the north of Gloucester, shows considerable and surprising variations in relief, due to the influence of a few more resistant thin beds in the midst of a sea of weak mudstones and shales, of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic age. The resistant beds appear many times, partly due to gentle folding, and partly because of faulting; each time producing characteristic landscape. A further complicating feature is the presence of remnants of the former flood plains of the Severn, now dissected by erosion during and since the Ice Age
Meet at the roadside (park on verge) at the junction between the Upleadon/Newent road with the B4211 at SO 800 280

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Wednesday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
When4 – 5 Jul 2017
WhereTBA (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Field Trip 4th or 5th July Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Thursday

19:15
 Bath Geol Soc Lecture - Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
WhenThu, 6 July, 19:15 – 21:45
WhereBath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, 16 Queen Square, Bath (map)
DescriptionCarbon Capture and Storage (CCS) – demonstrating the safety and performance of underground CO2 storage by site monitoring Professor Andy Chadwick, British Geological Survey Underground storage of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel combustion and other industrial processes offers the most credible way of achieving the deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions agreed at last year’s COP-21 climate change conference in Paris. The regulatory framework for underground CO2 storage has been set up via a European Directive. In this there is a regulatory requirement to prove that storage sites are not leaking, that their current behaviour is understood, and that stored CO2 will continue to be contained in the long term. Time-lapse monitoring at storage sites, using geophysical and geochemical techniques provides the means by which these quite challenging objectives can be met. Industrial-scale CO2 injection has been in operation at the Sleipner gas field in the Norwegian North Sea since 1996, with more than 16 million tonnes of CO2 now stored. A comprehensive time-lapse monitoring programme has been carried out, with a series of 3D seismic surveys providing strikingly clear images of the CO2 plume in the storage reservoir and its progressive spreading and growth with time. These can be matched with numerical fluid flow models to demonstrate that subsurface processes are well understood. Other monitoring datasets from storage sites worldwide also provide robust indication that we do understand the key physical processes controlling the behaviour of stored CO2 and that longer-term predictions of storage site performance are likely to be reliable.

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Friday


Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Saturday


Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Sunday

O.U. Geol Soc South West Branch - Field Trip
WhenSunday, 9 Jul 2017
DescriptionWest Somerset Coast Field Trip on July 9th 2017 Examine the evidence for a tectonic inversion on the West Somerset coast. leader: Dr Mark Anderson More details to follow


Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Mass extinctions

Mass Extinctions and are We in One?

In THIS article the author reviews the five - or is it six - major mass extinctions. (The Cretaceous-Tertiary one seems to slip from the list - after being mentioned!) 

He then goes on to speculate as to whether we are in one now and comes to a "perhaps if we continue as we are" sort of conclusion. It is difficult to be predictive when one is an observational scientist.

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Speculation on the core-mantle boundary

What is at the Core-Mantle Boundary?



This blog speculates about the crystal structure of the "blobs" at the core mantle boundary. So if the blobs are solid and the outer core liquid - do we have mountains in the mantle floating on the core? And is the inner core the earths largest crystal???

Saturday, 24 June 2017

Next week 26th June to 2nd July 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 26th June to 2nd July 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

Stroud Museum - Ichthyosaur Exhibition
When23 May – 9 Jul 2017
WhereGeology Gallery, Museum in the Park, Stratford Park, Stratford Road, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 4AF. (map)
DescriptionExhibition: The Watery World of the Ichthyosaur Tuesday 23 May - Sunday 9 July | Admission Free A mini exhibition in the Geology Gallery Taking our very own fossil baby Ichthyosaur, freshly cleaned and conserved, as its centrepiece, this temporary display will allow you to explore the underwater environment that this creature lived in. Discover what an Ichthyosaur ate for lunch, as well as the other creatures and plant life that shared its watery world. With artistic representations of how the Ichthyosaur lived around 190 million years ago, plus the fossilised remains of the Ichthyosaur and its contemporaries this exhibition is not to be missed. Supported by the The Curry Fund of the Geologists Association

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 26 June, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.

Tuesday

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 27 June, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Description Tuesday evenings in the summer: Field Course: Tues 6th June - Tues 18th July 2017 Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire (evening field course Tuesdays 7-9. Further sessions on website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green.27th June Cinderford to Edge Hills and the Flaxley Valley (Linear walk) The eastern flank of the Forest of Dean is formed from ancient rocks (of Old Red Sandstone and Carboniferous age) that have been pushed up to almost vertical from their original horizontal position. The hardest rock is the Quartz Conglomerate, forming the main rampart of the Forest and from which one of the most spectacular views in Gloucestershire can be seen. We will then, at Edge Hills, cross a succession of upturned beds, each forming a distinctive element in the landscape, and which each have been used by man in the past for different purposes. Meet on the roadside at the top end (eastern) of Cinderford GR SO 663 136. If approaching from Littledean, follow the hairpin bend round and turn right at the top of the hill

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Wednesday

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry


Thursday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
WhenThursday, 29 Jun 2017
WherePupil referral Unit opposite Maylite Trading Estate on B4197, just south round the corner from the village hall (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry


Friday

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry


Saturday

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry


Sunday

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry