Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Text books of my youth for sale

Text Books of My Youth Available

A correspondent who may be moving house has some old textbooks looking for a good home.

I remember using some of them when I was a student - I still have my copy of Deer, Howie and Zussman, and I am not parting with that!!!

The books available are:- 

Outline of Hisorical Geology - A.K. Wells - 5th edition - 1966

The Stratigraphy of the British Isles - Dorothy H. Rayner - 1967

An Introduction to the rock forming Minerals - Deer Howie and Zussman - 1967

Geological Structures and Maps - A. Roberts - 1961

Treatise on Sedimentation - William H. Twenhofel - 1962 - Vols. 1 and 2

British Palaeozoic Fossils -1964   )  Both publications of:
British Caenozoic Fossils - 1963  )   British Museum

Geodynamics of Pakistan - Geological Survey of Pakistan - 1979

If you are interested in any of the books, let me know and I will put you in touch with my correspondent.

Extinction wars

Was It the Asteroid: Was It the Deccan Traps?

This long, and well written, article follows an advocate of the Deccan Traps being the cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs on a field trip to India. It describes the disputes she has had with the asteroid backers and the difficulties she has faced - not all of them geological.

The article describes how scientific controversies can become entrenched and embittered.

You can listen to the article using the soundcloud player below



Or you can see it in cartoon form



Saturday, 11 August 2018

13th to 19th August 2018

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

13TH TO 19TH AUGUST 2018

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.

MENDIP HILLS AONB HAVE A SERIES OF EVENTS WHICH HAVE ONLY RECENTLY COME TO MY NOTICE. THEY CAN BE DISCOVERED HERE. I HAVE INSERTED SOME OF THEM BELOW. VISIT THE WEBSITE FOR BOOKING DETAILS.

MONDAY 13TH

Teme Valley Geological Society - Geological Walk
When
Monday, 13 Aug 2018
Description
 Part of OUGS Symposium–walks around Martley area, examining the geological sites

TUESDAY 14TH

BATTS COMBE QUARRY TOUR – A LIMESTONE LEGACY
August 14 @ 10:00AM - 12:00PM. Also 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
£5.00
A guided tour with Hanson’s UK to view inside this Burrington Oolite quarry, a mineral very valuable as a pure limestone for animal feed, toothpaste and many industrial fillers. Wear boots, long sleeves, no shorts, safety wear provided.

Meet at Batts Combe Quarry office car park, Warrens Hill, Cheddar, BS27 3LR.Limited places. Charge £5pp.


wednesday 15th


Thursday 16th

Thornbury Geology Group, 7.30pm, The Chantry, Thornbury
When
Thu, 16 August, 19:00 – 21:30
Description
Thornbury Geology Group, 7.30pm at The Chantry, Thornbury, and every 3rd Thursday in the month.  

Friday 17th


saturday 18th

BANWELL BONE CAVES TOUR– “GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF BANWELL CAVES AND FOLLIES”
August 18 @ 2:15 pm - 5:00 pm
£15.00
A chance to see early 19th Century follies and pleasure garden with unique bone cave, follies & grottoes not often open to the public.

Banwell Caves, Banwell Lane, BS29 6NA. Limited places, for info contact SESC 01749 840156

£15pp, (children under 16 free), tea/cake available. 

Sunday 19th



Have you heard of the Meghalyan?

Anthropocene vs Meghalayan

You may have heard of the Anthropocene being proposed as a geological time period. But the IUGS (the International Union of Geological Sciences) is having none of that. They say we are still in the Holocene and particularly in the Meghalayan Age.

This has led to a big argument which you can read about HERE. I reckon this will run and run. 

Origin of animals backdated

First Animal Found in Ediacaran?

Stromatoveris psygmoglena is a soft bodied animal found in the Cambrian. Recently many well preserved examples have been found in China. The author of THIS ARTICLE examined them and compared them to Ediacaran fossils and declares them to be the same.

So animal origins go back further than we previously thought.

The comments below the article are worth a look. 

A Cambrian fossil of Stromatoveris from Northwest University, China. J. Hoyal Cuthill

How to date a landslide

Correlating Landslides and Earthquakes in Cascadia

HERE is a longish article about how to date landslides and see whether the landslides are caused by earthquakes. And so far they have not found a landslide with the same age as the great earthquake of 1700.

The technique involves dendrochronology. Trees which died as the result of drowning in lakes formed by landslides are dated and their outermost ring gives the date of the landslide. A rather nice way to get a specific date.


Fig. 1. (left) This slab sample from a drowned tree (visible in the background) in Klickitat Lake in Oregon provides a record of the years before a landslide dam formed this lake, inundating the forest. Slabs with a sufficient number of tree rings can be correlated to regional tree ring records. (right) This correlation is evident from the thinner rings beginning in 1739, shown in this close-up view of tree rings within the slab. Thinner rings document a profound growth slowdown, characteristic of Douglas fir trees throughout Cascadia. The outermost increment that formed immediately under the bark shows that this tree died in 1751. Similar records from other drowned trees could be linked to landslides triggered by great (~M9) earthquake that shook the region in 1700. Credit: Will Struble



Kilauea eruption slowing down?

Kilauea Eruption Slowing Down?

It might be - or perhaps not. Read the speculation HERE.

Lava weakly bubbles from KÄ«lauea’s fissure 8, a significant change from the voluminous lava fountains that had been seen in previous weeks. The photograph was taken during an overflight survey on 7 August. Credit: USGS

Down to Earth Extra - August

Down to Earth Extra - August

Sunday, 5 August 2018

Two interesting publications

Two Interesting Publications 

I came across these recently and you may find them of interest.

GEOconservationNEWSletter

AND

OUGS Wessex Branch Newsletter
(after the Geoconservation Newsletter)

Saturday, 4 August 2018

6th to 12th August 2018

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

6th to 12th August 2018

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.

MENDIP HILLS AONB HAVE A SERIES OF EVENTS WHICH HAVE ONLY RECENTLY COME TO MY NOTICE. THEY CAN BE DISCOVERED HERE. I HAVE INSERTED SOME OF THEM BELOW. VISIT THE WEBSITE FOR BOOKING DETAILS.

MONDAY 6th


Tuesday 7th

TORR WORKS QUARRY TOURS WITH SOMERSET EARTH SCIENCE CENTRE
August 7 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm and @ 2 pm - 4 pm
£5.00
Join the team at Somerset Earth Science Centre for a minibus tour of one of the UK’s largest working Limestone Quarries, at Torr Works, near Frome. Morning/afternoon tours, boots/waterproofs,long sleeves & no shorts please.

Car parking at SESC. £5pp. 16 years + only. Max 10 in group.

Info: Gill Odolphie 01749 840156

Wednesday 8th


Thursday 9th


friday 10th

PEN HILL GEO WALK PART 2 August 10 @ 10:00 am - 1:00 pm FREE A walk led by geologist Doug Robinson tracing ~ 200 million years
of Earth history from the Carboniferous to Jurassic periods, from
the southern tropics across the equator into desert settings then
invasion by the Jurassic seas. Walk of ~ 4.5 km with elevation gain of ~ 165 m.
Walk along public footpaths, roadside including A39 and crossing
of this trunk road. Meet on footpath at junction of North Rd and
Little Entry lane, Wells (ST 5536 4627). Parking close to start point
available along Ash Lane (ST 5486 4646), or College Road
(ST 5510 4628). ---------------------------
OUGS Symposium - 'Music of the Earth'
When
10 – 12 Aug 2018
Where
St John’s Campus, Worcester University (map)
Description
Geology of the Worcester area, the Malvern Hills, and Martley

saturday 11th


OUGS Symposium - 'Music of the Earth'
--------------------------------------
SWGA - Family Geology Day, Penarth
When
Saturday, 11 Aug 2018
Description

Leaders. tbc

This is a public geological event aimed at encouraging families to come along and, hopefully, get
interested in geology. We will be looking for fossils, minerals and rocks along the beach and
pointing out other things of geological interest. This is an open-ended event where people can
come for as long or short as they wish and we would be grateful for support from as many of you
as is possible. If you are willing to attend and help out please let the Programme Secretary know
in advance.
------------------------------------

Teme Valley Geological Society - Geological Walk
When
Saturday, 11 Aug 2018
Description
 Part of OUGS Symposium–walks around Martley area, examining the geological sites


Sunday 12th

“MENDIP LEAD MINING” GUIDED WALK August 12 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm FREE Guided walk with Richard Frost of the Mendip Society to
discover the history of this fascinating industry on
Charterhouse. Parking at Blackmoor Car Park (along lane to left of
Charterhouse centre). Some uneven ground/stiles.
Boots/waterproofs. Grid reference: ST505556.
------------------------------------
OUGS Symposium - 'Music of the Earth'


Update on Kilauea

Changes in Hawaii

In a previous post I wrote about what is happening in Hawaii. Here is an update.


Lava covers the Kapoho Beach Lots on 6th June 2018. We stayed there in 2011

To get an idea of what it was like before, see my blog of 2011 HERE, HERE and HERE. (The beard is long gone!)

Thursday, 2 August 2018

New Nick Chidlaw Course

PROPOSED 4 DAY FIELD COURSE ‘ FIELD GEOLOGY FROM THE MALVERN HILLS TO THE COTSWOLDS’


Field Course across a Geological Borderland
 
PROPOSED 4 DAY FIELD COURSE ‘ FIELD GEOLOGY FROM THE MALVERN HILLS TO THE COTSWOLDS’
 
Lifelong Learning 4 day course
 
October 2018:  Saturday 20th – Tuesday 23rd
 
10.00 am – 5.00 pm each day
 
This highly scenic area spans the boundary between older folded rocks seen in much of Wales, and younger flatter rocks in southern England. The course includes those from Precambrian to Jurassic age: metamorphics on the craggy Malverns, red desert strata in a cliff on the River Severn, and shelly oolitic limestones (some formerly containing dinosaur bones) in Cotswold quarries.
 
No prior knowledge of geology or the locations is assumed.  
 
 
Please note you will need to make your own travel and accommodation arrangements; meeting times and places to be confirmed.
 
The course is organised through Cardiff University. It carries assessment, which is very difficult to fail! Attendees usually find assessment on these courses useful for consolidating what they have learned.
 
Tuition fee is £165.00 (concessionary fee available £132.00).   
 
Enrolments can be made by ‘phoning 029 2087 0000  or see website www.cardiff.ac.uk/learn
 
For more information on course content and specific locations, contact tutor