Saturday, 12 August 2017

Next week 14th to 20th August 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 14th to 20th August 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


All Week (except Monday)

10:00
 Bristol City Museum - Pliosaurus!
WhenSun, 13 August, 10:00 – 17:00
WhereBristol Museum & Art Gallery (map)
DescriptionTravel back in time 150 million years and dive into Bristol’s Jurassic seas. We dare you to come face to face with one very special creature – an eight metre long Pliosaurus called Doris. She’s the ultimate predator and you’ll be awestruck as you touch her skin, listen to her heartbeat and smell her disgusting breath! Then travel forward to the present day to find out more about this amazing beast. See her actual fossil – one of the world’s most complete – and play games to discover more about her life and death. All the family can have fun investigating the science that helped us bring her back to life. Ideal for children aged 3-11 years old. Discovered in Westbury, Wiltshire in 1994, our internationally significant specimen is the world’s only example of a new species of pliosaur – Pliosaurus carpenteri – and will be on public display for the first time. Pliosaurs are so big that it took ten years to prepare all the fossils that were found. Bristol Museum & Art Gallery opening times: Tue-Sun: 10am-5pm Closed Mondays except Bank Holiday Mondays and Mondays during Bristol school holidays: 10am-5pm

Monday

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 14 August, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318

Tuesday

19:30
 SMFS Evening Meeting
WhenTue, 15 August, 19:30 – 22:00
WhereFriends’ Meeting House, Ordnance Road, Southampton, SO15 2AZ (map)
DescriptionAnnual Swap & Sale Evening. Bring along unwanted minerals, fossils, rocks, books, anything of geological interest, to exchange or sell.

Wednesday



Thursday

19:30
 Thornbury Geology Group meeting
WhenThu, 17 August, 19:30 – 20:30
Description Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882 The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee

Friday



Saturday

SWGA Field Trip - The Old Red Sandstone of the Ruperra area near Cardiff
WhenSaturday, 19 Aug 2017
WhereMeet at 10:30 am at Coed Llwyncelyn car park, near Rudry (ST 202 854) (map)
DescriptionThe Old Red Sandstone of the Ruperra area near Cardiff Leaders: Tom Sharpe and John Davies

14:00
 Wiltshire Museum event: GUIDED GEOLOGY WALK
WhenSat, 19 August, 14:00 – 17:00
WhereWindmill Hill: ST 872 311 (map)
DescriptionA 4 mile (3 hour) walk led by Isobel Geddes (along footpaths, tracks & lanes) looking at geology, landscape and building stones. The varied geology with steeply dipping rocks makes the terrain hilly but there is a spectacular view over the Stour valley. Meet Saturday 19th August 2017 at 2 pm. at Windmill Hill: ST 872 311. Stout footwear, protective clothing to suit the prevailing weather conditions and reasonable mobility will be required (participants must be able to walk at least four miles at a reasonable pace). Walk includes a steep hill and is expected to take about 2.5 hours.

Sunday




Weighing titanosaurs

Patagotitan mayorum - how much did it weigh?

A lot! But science needs a bit more accuracy than that, so this article discusses how to estimate the weight of the largest titanosaur found so far. And comes to no very definite conclusion. It is thought to be 8 to 18% heavier than Argentinosaurus hiunculensis (the previous largest dinosaur) which is thought to have weighed 73 tons.


Patagotitan reconstruction
And you can practise your Spanish comprehension by listening to the video!

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Tolkien - not a geologist!

Middle Earth - a Geological Nightmare!

Tolkien's Middle Earth does not make geological sense
This article discusses the authors hangups with the map in "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings". He gets quite upset about it - but not as much as the people who comment on him!

I doubt that Tolkien would be much bothered.

Saturday, 5 August 2017

Next week 7th to 13th August 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 7th to 13th August 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 7 August, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318

Tuesday



Wednesday



Thursday



Friday



Saturday



Sunday



Saturday, 29 July 2017

Next week 31st July to 6th August 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 31st July to 6th August 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 31 July, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318


Tuesday




Wednesday




Thursday




Friday




Saturday




Sunday





Sea Dragons of Somerset

Ichthyosaurs on Display in Street


It may come as a surprise to many that there is nationally important collection of ichthyosaurs in Street. The fossils were found (or acquired by) Alfred Gillett, a cousin of the Clark (the shoemakers) family.

The details of where and when are given above, details of the collection are HERE, and much more can be found HERE

Human origins - evidence continues to accrue

Do we have Neanderthal Mitochondrial DNA?

An article in the Guardian presents evidence from a Neanderthal femur found in 1937 in the Hohlenstein Stadel cave in South West Germany. 

One day we will have a clear picture concerning human origins. At the moment we do not and this article goes through various possibilities in a well informed way. At the moment large hypotheses are being built on tiny amounts of information. But how else do we know what questions to ask?

The Hohlenstein Stadel cave, north of Langenau, Germany

Saturday, 8 July 2017

Next 3 weeks 10th to 30th July 2017

NEXT 3 WEEKS EVENTS

 10th to 30th July 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday 10th

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 10 July, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 11 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Description Penyard Park, the Coughton Meander, and the strange Weston “hollows” Penyard Park represents the furthest extent northwards of the outcrop of the Quartz Conglomerate, the extremely resistant rock that forms the outer ramparts of the Forest of Dean. It has been isolated from the main outcrop (on Howle Hill) by a large valley with a strangely small “misfit” stream (the Coughton Valley)which is thought to be one part of a large meander of the River Wye, now abandoned like a huge ox-bow.We will climb to the top of the hill to see the evidence for this, and the reason for the existence of the hill. Meet at the rough (Church) car park just to the east of the Church in Weston under Penyard SO 632 232


Wednesday




Thursday




Friday

19:00
 Cheltenham MGS Lecture - Minerals of the Malvern Hills
WhenFri, 14 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereShurdington at The Century Hall (map)
DescriptionAdrian Wyatt Minerals of the Malvern Hills


Saturday




Sunday

OUGS Wessex - Day Trip "Climate and environmental change in the Cretaceous"
WhenSunday, 16 Jul 2017
WhereWorbarrow Bay, Dorset (map)
DescriptionClimate and environmental change in the Cretaceous - Jeremy Cranmer An opportunity to see evidence of climate and environmental change in the Cretaceous at Worbarrow Bay, Dorset Jeremy Cranmer is an amateur geologist who lives in West Dorset very near to the Jurassic Coast. He is OUGS Wessex Branch day trips organizer. By starting at the summit of the Purbeck Hills we shall gain an overview of the geology of the valley we are about to visit so that we can understand how the landscape has been developed by the underlying geology. We shall then visit the coast at Worbarrow Bay which crops-cuts this valley to follow the Cretaceous succession through its various climate and sea level changes between the Portland Stone and the Chalk. Jeremy says "I have never visited this location without noticing something new.” This expedition should be of particular interest to OU students studying environmental science as well as geologists. Please contact the organiser of this event for booking information. Jeremy Cranmer [wessexdaytrips@ougs.org]


Monday 17th




Tuesday

18:00
 Geol Soc Lecture - The ground beneath our feet - Redcliffe Sandstone revisited
WhenTue, 18 July, 18:00 – 19:00
WhereThe Hub, Aztec West (map)
DescriptionAlan Cattell, Structural Soils Ltd The ground beneath our feet - Redcliffe Sandstone revisited

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 18 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Description The Ledbury Hills The Ledbury hills, although not as striking as their near neighbours, the Malverns, were formed as a result of the same set of earth movements, by folding of the Silurian rocks (approx 420 million years) from which they have since been carved. The rocks have varying resistance to erosion, forming ridges and valleys on an intimate scale, which are repeated by the effect of folding. A truly beautiful landscape. Highly fossiliferous limestones and mudstones Meet at the laneside around the church and school at Eastnor GR SO 733 373


Wednesday




Thursday

19:30
 Thornbury Geology Group meeting
WhenThu, 20 July, 19:30 – 20:30
Description Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882 The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee


Friday




Saturday




Sunday

SWGA Field Trip - Manorbier, Pembrokeshire, Leader: Sid Howells
WhenSunday, 23 Jul 2017
WhereMeet at 10:00 am at the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park car park below Manorbier Castle (SS 063 977) (map)
Description Manorbier, Pembrokeshire, Leader: Sid Howells


Monday 24th

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 24 July, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318


Tuesday




Wednesday




Thursday




Friday




Saturday




Sunday 30th





Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Chicken in Aspic - Cretaceous Style

Baby Bird found in Amber

The Guardian reports HERE on a hatchling Enantiorthine bird found in amber in Burma. For a newspaper it is a remarkably detailed report and well worth reading. I won't write more as the article does it better than I can!


And HERE are some Chicken in Aspic recipes

Dark clouds; silver linings

Geological Insights from Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370

Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 disappeared on the 8th March 2014. The search for any remains was concentrated in the Indian Ocean, west of Australia. A by-product of the search is state-of-the-art maps of the ocean floor.

This article gives a good introduction to what was found (no aircraft bits, unfortunately) and contrast it with our previous knowledge.

3-D image showing the diamantina Escarpment, looking northwest (upslope). The largest seamount in this area, about 1.5 kilometers high, appears in the foreground. In the middle and background, the escarpment and trough mark the northern margin of the rift. Vertical exaggeration is 3 times. Credit: Kim Picard and Jonah Sullivan.

The differences in resolution between multibeam and satellite-derived bathymetry data for the northern flank of Broken Ridge are apparent here. Numerous mass wasting features are evident, including slides and debris flows (delineated by their head scarps) that crosscut and run out as debris fans into the large semicircular depression

Friday, 30 June 2017

Next week 3rd to 9th July 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 3rd to 9th July 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday
Stroud Museum - Ichthyosaur Exhibition
When23 May – 9 Jul 2017
WhereGeology Gallery, Museum in the Park, Stratford Park, Stratford Road, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 4AF. (map)
DescriptionExhibition: The Watery World of the Ichthyosaur Tuesday 23 May - Sunday 9 July | Admission Free A mini exhibition in the Geology Gallery Taking our very own fossil baby Ichthyosaur, freshly cleaned and conserved, as its centrepiece, this temporary display will allow you to explore the underwater environment that this creature lived in. Discover what an Ichthyosaur ate for lunch, as well as the other creatures and plant life that shared its watery world. With artistic representations of how the Ichthyosaur lived around 190 million years ago, plus the fossilised remains of the Ichthyosaur and its contemporaries this exhibition is not to be missed. Supported by the The Curry Fund of the Geologists Association

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 3 July, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
When4 – 5 Jul 2017
WhereTBA (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Field Trip 4th or 5th July Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35

19:00
 Dave Green's Geology and Landscape in Gloucestershire
WhenTue, 4 July, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereSee website, separate leaflet, and/or by contacting Dave Green. (map)
Ashleworth, Staunton and Corse Lawn
This area, in the subdued topography of the Severn Vale to the north of Gloucester, shows considerable and surprising variations in relief, due to the influence of a few more resistant thin beds in the midst of a sea of weak mudstones and shales, of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic age. The resistant beds appear many times, partly due to gentle folding, and partly because of faulting; each time producing characteristic landscape. A further complicating feature is the presence of remnants of the former flood plains of the Severn, now dissected by erosion during and since the Ice Age
Meet at the roadside (park on verge) at the junction between the Upleadon/Newent road with the B4211 at SO 800 280

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Wednesday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
When4 – 5 Jul 2017
WhereTBA (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Field Trip 4th or 5th July Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Thursday

19:15
 Bath Geol Soc Lecture - Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
WhenThu, 6 July, 19:15 – 21:45
WhereBath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, 16 Queen Square, Bath (map)
DescriptionCarbon Capture and Storage (CCS) – demonstrating the safety and performance of underground CO2 storage by site monitoring Professor Andy Chadwick, British Geological Survey Underground storage of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel combustion and other industrial processes offers the most credible way of achieving the deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions agreed at last year’s COP-21 climate change conference in Paris. The regulatory framework for underground CO2 storage has been set up via a European Directive. In this there is a regulatory requirement to prove that storage sites are not leaking, that their current behaviour is understood, and that stored CO2 will continue to be contained in the long term. Time-lapse monitoring at storage sites, using geophysical and geochemical techniques provides the means by which these quite challenging objectives can be met. Industrial-scale CO2 injection has been in operation at the Sleipner gas field in the Norwegian North Sea since 1996, with more than 16 million tonnes of CO2 now stored. A comprehensive time-lapse monitoring programme has been carried out, with a series of 3D seismic surveys providing strikingly clear images of the CO2 plume in the storage reservoir and its progressive spreading and growth with time. These can be matched with numerical fluid flow models to demonstrate that subsurface processes are well understood. Other monitoring datasets from storage sites worldwide also provide robust indication that we do understand the key physical processes controlling the behaviour of stored CO2 and that longer-term predictions of storage site performance are likely to be reliable.

Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Friday


Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Saturday


Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry

Sunday

O.U. Geol Soc South West Branch - Field Trip
WhenSunday, 9 Jul 2017
DescriptionWest Somerset Coast Field Trip on July 9th 2017 Examine the evidence for a tectonic inversion on the West Somerset coast. leader: Dr Mark Anderson More details to follow


Stroud Museum - see Monday's entry