Friday, 19 May 2017

Next week 22nd to 28th May 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

22nd to 28th May 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 22 May, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

09:45
 Somerset Geology Group - Meeting
WhenTue, 23 May, 09:45 – 13:00
WhereThe Meeting Room, Alfred Gillett Trust, The Grange, Farm Road, Street, somerset (map)
DescriptionAs per our last Update we will be holding a meeting of our Somerset Geology Group (SGG) network on the morning of Tues 23 May 2017. It will be a chance to: meet each other (including Lesley Dunlop, chair of GeoConservationUK, who we are delighted to say will be joining us); learn more about our partnership project with Somerset Environmental Record Centre (SERC) to review Somerset’s Local Geological Sites; discuss opportunities for voluntary involvement on that project; and to discuss the future organisation of SGG. We will end the meeting with a special tour of the fossil collection held by the Alfred Gillett Trust (led by SGG member and AG Trust volunteer, David Hill); and we will be able to chat over a picnic lunch for those that will. Please email Garry Dawson at Somersetgeology@gmail.com if you plan to come so that we have an idea of numbers. See attached for location & car parking (in the adjacent Clarks Village car park). The meeting room is on the first floor which is only accessible via stairs, so our apologies that it is not fully accessible: let Garry know if you need any further detail re accessibility and/or to arrange a parking space close to the building for you, as there is very limited space there. Agenda - Coffee from 9.45am; meeting starting at 10.15am. Welcome and introductions Presentation: progress in developing our project to review Somerset’s Local Geological Sites Discussion on the project , including the potential for voluntary input from SGG members; The national context from Lesley Dunlop, Chair of GeoConservationUK; Future organisation of SGG – including summary of SGG activity over the last year; proposed structure for the future; potential volunteer tasks to assist organisation; and next meeting (potentially in October as part of Mendip Rocks Festival) 12 – 1pm: A special guided tour of the fossil collection held by the Alfred Gillett Trust This includes many fine specimens of Ichthyosaurs, recovered from quarries around Street. The collection was amassed by Alfred Gillet (1814-1904), a retired local ironmonger, and was displayed in the Crispin Hall, Street, until around 1948. For further information see: https://alfredgilletttrust.wordpress.com/collections/geological-collection 1- 2 pm: Picnic lunch We will be able to chat informally over picnic lunch, either in the meeting room or there is a small garden/orchard area outside if the weather is fine. You are welcome to bring a picnic (or there are food outlets nearby). Looking forward to meeting you! Wendy Lutley, Coordinator Working in partnership with Somerset Environmental Record Centre (SERC); for more information visit www.somerc.com/somerset+geology+group/; a member of GeoConservationUK, the Association of UK groups, whose mission is to: ‘encourage the appreciation, conservation and promotion of local/regional geological sites for education and public benefit’. Our thanks to the Alfred Gillett Trust for hosting this meeting for us.


Wednesday




Thursday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
WhenThursday, 25 May 2017
WherePupil referral Unit opposite Maylite Trading Estate on B4197, just south round the corner from the village hall (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35


Friday




Saturday




Sunday






Zuul crurivastator

Dinosaurs meet Ghostbusters - what not to like?

Judy Hible has brought THIS ARTICLE to my attention. Zuul crurivastator is reported as having a remarkable similarity to monster from the 1984 film Ghostbusters. Not having seen the film I cannot comment. (I lead a very sheltered life.) But the discoverers see the resemblance and the name Zuul comes from the film.

Zuul crurivastator, (which translates as Zuul destroyer of shins) left, alongside Zuul the Gatekeeper of Ghostbusters fame. (I find the resemblance unconvincing.)

The Guardian article gives a lot of information. The original, academic, article can be found HERE and that gives a HUGE amount of information.

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

See Naples and proceed with caution!

Will Campi Flegri erupt soon?

Bruce Buswell has brought this article to my attention. The Campi Flegri or (for those with a Classical education) the Phlegraean Fields is a volcanic caldera just west of downtown Naples.


There are now indications that the magma beneath the caldera is moving and this may indicate that an eruption may be expected sometime. It probably won't be big and it may not be soon but it will happen eventually. 

If you have ever been to Naples the thought of evacuation cannot be imagined. Would you leave your house empty and know that other people know it is empty - in Naples!!! The streets of Naples are in perpetual gridlock even at the best of times. I'm glad I am not in charge of arranging such a thing.

Lava lamp earth

Earth's Magnetic Field - Flipping and Lava Lamps

In this article the author writes that flipping of the earth's magnetic field may be caused by recently discovered "large-low-velocity-provinces" or "blobs" at the junction of the earth's core and mantle. These have been discovered by study of seismic oscillations caused by major earthquakes. 

As she writes :-

These regions might be less dense simply because they are hotter. But an exciting alternative possibility is that the chemical composition of these parts of the mantle cause them to behave like the blobs in a lava lamp. This would mean they heat up and periodically rise towards the surface, before cooling and splashing back down on the core.

Such behaviour would change the way in which heat is extracted from the core’s surface over millions of years. And this could explain why the Earth’s magnetic field sometimes reverses. The fact that the field has changed so many times in the Earth’s history suggests that the internal structure we know today may also have changed.

We know the core is covered with a landscape of mountains and valleys like the Earth’s surface. By using more data from Earth oscillations to study this topography, we will be able to produce more detailed maps of the core that will give us a much better understanding of what is going on deep below our feet.

I knew staring at these wasn't just a waste of time!

Street Meeting

Somerset Geology Group Meeting


I have been asked to publicise a meeting of the Somerset Geology Group to which anyone with an interest in Somerset geology is welcome. 
This is the sort of thing that this blog was started for! If you have a meeting which needs publicity - let me know!

Details follow:-

Meeting: 10.15am- 1pm (coffee from 9.45am)
Tuesday 23 May 2017, the meeting room,
Alfred Gillett Trust, The Grange, Farm Road,
Street, Somerset 

As per our last Update we will be holding a meeting of our Somerset Geology Group (SGG) network on the morning of Tues 23 May 2017. It will be a chance to: meet each other (including Lesley Dunlop, chair of GeoConservationUK, who we are delighted to say will be joining us); learn more about our partnership project with Somerset Environmental Record Centre (SERC) to review Somerset’s Local Geological Sites; discuss opportunities for voluntary involvement on that project; and to discuss the future organisation of SGG. We will end the meeting with a special tour of the fossil collection held by the Alfred  Gillett Trust (led by SGG member and AG Trust volunteer, David Hill); and we will be able to chat over a picnic lunch for those that will.  

Please email Garry Dawson at  Somersetgeology@gmail.com   if you plan to come so that we have an idea of numbers. See attached for location & car parking (in the adjacent Clarks Village car park). 

The meeting room is on the first floor which is only accessible via stairs, so our apologies that it is not fully accessible: let Garry know if you need any further detail re accessibility and/or to arrange a parking space close to the building for you, as there is very limited space there.

Agenda - Coffee from 9.45am; meeting starting at 10.15am.
  • ·         Welcome and introductions
  • ·         Presentation: progress in developing our project to review Somerset’s Local Geological Sites
  • ·         Discussion on the project , including the potential  for voluntary input from SGG members;
  • ·         The national context from Lesley Dunlop, Chair of GeoConservationUK;
  • ·         Future organisation of SGG  – including summary of SGG activity over the last year; proposed structure for the future;  potential volunteer tasks to assist organisation; and next meeting  (potentially in October as part of Mendip Rocks Festival)

12 – 1pm:  A special guided tour of the fossil collection held by the Alfred Gillett Trust

This includes many fine specimens of Ichthyosaurs, recovered from quarries around Street. The collection was amassed by Alfred Gillet (1814-1904), a retired local ironmonger, and was displayed in the Crispin Hall, Street, until around 1948. For further information see:  https://alfredgilletttrust.wordpress.com/collections/geological-collection

1- 2 pm:  Picnic lunch   

We will be able to chat informally over picnic lunch, either in the meeting room or there is a small garden/orchard area outside if the weather is fine. You are welcome to bring a picnic (or there are food outlets nearby).

Looking forward to meeting you! Wendy Lutley, Coordinator  

Working in partnership with Somerset Environmental Record Centre (SERC); for more information visit www.somerc.com/somerset+geology+group/; a member of GeoConservationUK, the Association of UK groups, whose mission is to: encourage the appreciation, conservation and promotion of local/regional geological sites for education and public benefit’. Our thanks to the Alfred Gillett Trust for hosting this meeting for us.

Whales teeth

Baleen Whale with Teeth (just)

Whales started out as "something like a bear" to quote Darwin. This article describes a fossil where teeth are on the cusp (sorry!) of being replaced by fibrous plates called baleen for filter feeding. It also may have had small vestigial hind legs. The fossil was found in southern Peru and further finds are expected to clarify the transition.



TOOTHED MYSTICETE Mystacodon was a small- to medium-sized whale, a precursor to today’s humpback and blue whales. The skeleton of Mystacodon gives new clues to how this whale lineage first began to split off from other whales.

Saturday, 13 May 2017

Next week 15th to 21st May 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

15th to 21st May 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 15 May, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday




Wednesday

Geol Soc Field Trip
WhenWednesday, 17 May 2017
WhereClifton Suspension Bridge Visitors Centre (map)
DescriptionWestern: Hard Hat tour of the Clifton Suspension Bridge Abutments Please Book Summer Fieldtrip - FULL Contact westernregionalgroup@gmail.com for more information


Thursday

Teme Valley Geological Society - Evening Geology Course
WhenThursday, 18 May 2017
WherePupil referral Unit opposite Maylite Trading Estate on B4197, just south round the corner from the village hall (map)
Description Evening Geology Course Volcanoes in action – their magmas and minerals Dr Paul Olver Contact John 01886 888318 Cost £35

19:30
 Thornbury Geology Group meeting
WhenThu, 18 May, 19:30 – 20:30
Description Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882 The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee

Friday




Saturday

South Gloucestershire Mines Research Group Outing
WhenSaturday, 20 May 2017
WhereTo be confirmed (map)
DescriptionTo be announced contact Steve Hillyard 0117 923 6595


Sunday





Friday, 12 May 2017

Pliosaurus Volunteers

Pliosaurus Exhibition Volunteers wanted at Bristol Museum

Ryan Lewis, the Volunteer Co-ordinator at Bristol Museum has asked me to help publicise this. And we are pleased to do so.

The application form can be found HERE.


Ryan writes:-


Pliosaurus exhibition volunteers wanted at Bristol Museum.

An exciting opportunity has arisen to volunteer with Bristol Museum’s new and exciting exhibition Pliosaurus! Taking visitors on a journey back in time 150 million years when Bristol was once a Jurassic ocean ruled by the huge marine reptile, the pliosaur (Pliosaurus carpenteri). The exhibition will be a fully interactive experience and will include:
A time portal taking visitors back to Bristol 150 million years ago
A full-scale interactive model of our very own Pliosaurus carpenteri (8 metres long), including heartbeat, smelly breath and injuries to investigate
One of the largest and most complete pliosaur fossils in the world. Found by local fossil hunter Simon Carpenter.
6 satellite learning stations to discover how our pliosaur lived and died, including the skills and techniques used by palaeontologists throughout the process.
Focused on families with young children we’re looking for volunteers to engage, inspire and have fun as we take museum visitors through this interactive journey. The exhibition will run from June 17th until January 7th, 2018 with the key aims of creating a fun and memorable learning environment,helping to develop an interest in science, and encouraging further interaction with Bristol Museum. 

Why volunteer?

  • Learn new skills and further your knowledge in natural history, palaeontology and more
  • Gain valuable insight into the important role Bristol Museum has in the Bristol community
  • Enhance your CV and gain experience in an exciting cultural learning institute
  • Inspire the next generation into learning more about science and natural history
  • Meet new people, make new friends and have some fun!
You do not need to be an expert in the area but an interest in natural history and talking to the public is an advantage. Volunteering opportunities will be for one day each week, on a regular basis, and training will be provided. To register your interest, fill in the application and contact:pliosaurus.volunteering@gmail.com

Thursday, 11 May 2017

Sand and time

Disappearing and Reappearing Beaches

Dooagh beach on Achill Island disappeared in 1984 and has, very recently, reappeared. Simon Boxall of Southampton University explains HERE how this is a fairly common occurrence. Apparently the absence of sea weed is of importance.

The missing beach, 1984


The returned beach, 2017





Monday, 8 May 2017

North West Highlands in textile

Hang the Moine Thrust on Your Wall!!!

Jane Hunter, a textile artist, is offering to give half the sale price of her work to help fund the valuable work of the North West Highlands Geopark. I wrote about the fundraising efforts of the Geopark a few weeks ago. You can still donate on this page.  

You can see Jane's North West Highlands works HERE.


More of her work can be seen on her website HERE


Saturday, 6 May 2017

Next week 8th to 14th May 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

8th to 14th May 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

19:30
 Dave Green's Geology of the Oceans
WhenMon, 8 May, 19:30 – 21:30
WhereWynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
DescriptionThe Geology of the Oceans past and present (including plate tectonics, environments, and current/developing ideas on oceanography and marine geology). Often termed the last frontier to be explored on Earth, there have been great advances in our understanding of the oceanic realm over the past half century. This course aims to study the main developments and what we might expect in the future, based on current research. Monday 24th April, for 10 weeks, until 10th July (not 1st nor 29th May). Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70.


Tuesday

18:00
 Geol Soc Lecture - Geological Fakes and Frauds
WhenTue, 9 May, 18:00 – 19:30
WhereThe Hub, Aztec West (map)
DescriptionAlistair Ruffell, Belfast The Western Regional Group is pleased to invite Dr Alastair Ruffell from Queen’s University Belfast. During this talk, Alastair will be sharing his experience using Earth science techniques in forensics for the search of hidden objects and trace evidence analysis, and how systems of valuation are affected by fraud. Some geological fakes and frauds are carried out solely for financial gain (mining fraud), whereas others maybe have increasing aesthetic appeal (faked fossils) or academic advancement (fabricated data) as their motive. All types of geological fake or fraud can be ingenious and sophisticated. Fake gems, faked fossils and mining fraud are common examples where monetary profit is to blame: nonetheless these may impact both scientific theory and the reputation of geologists and Earth scientists. The substitution or fabrication of both physical and intellectual data also occurs for no direct financial gain, such as career advancement or establishment of belief (e.g. evolution vs. creationism). Knowledge of such fakes and frauds may assist in spotting undetected geological crimes: application of geoforensic techniques helps the scientific community to detect such activity, which ultimately undermines scientific integrity. This interactive talk will introduce forensic geology and then demonstrate with a series of case studies the application of this discipline to the history of, and investigation into, fakes and frauds. These will include geological crimes committed for purely financial gain (oil/gas, water, gems/precious metals) and academic fakes, especially fossils. Fakes and frauds that use analyses familiar to geologists will be considered (XRD, FTIR, SEM, radiocarbon) in archaeology, antiques, paintings and manuscripts. We will end with the weird and wonderful – geological frauds and fakes that were the result of nonscientific belief, academic rivalry and probably pure madness, but the audience


Wednesday

Geol Soc Field Trip
WhenWednesday, 10 May 2017
WhereClifton Suspension Bridge Visitors Centre (map)
DescriptionWestern: Hard Hat tour of the Clifton Suspension Bridge Abutments Please Book Summer Fieldtrip - FULL Contact westernregionalgroup@gmail.com for more information


Thursday




Friday

19:00
 Cheltenham MGS Lecture - Microfossils
WhenFri, 12 May, 19:00 – 21:00
WhereShurdington at The Century Hall (map)
DescriptionDr Alice Kennedy, Head of Geology, Gloucestershire Geology Trust Introduction to microfossils, their importance studying extreme environmental change


Saturday

SWGA Field Trip - Sully and the Bendricks
WhenSaturday, 13 May 2017
WhereMeet at 10:30 at the Bendricks, on the roadside opposite the entrance to the Vale Recycling Centre on the Atlantic Trading Estate, Barry, CF63 3RF (ST 134 673) (map)
DescriptionLeader: Professor Maurice Tucker Meet at 10:30 at the Bendricks, on the roadside opposite the entrance to the Vale Recycling Centre on the Atlantic Trading Estate, Barry, CF63 3RF (ST 134 673) The Triassic sediments (Mercia Mudstone/Keuper Marl) of coastal Glamorgan were deposited in a large lake or inland sea and by rivers draining from hills of Carboniferous rocks to the North. The climate was hot and arid and evaporates, gypsum and halite, were periodically precipitated in and around the lake. Lacustrine Limestones and dolomites with stromatolites and palaeosoils are present and within these and thin bedded, sheet-flood sandstones. Dinosaur footprints can be observed. There are also travertine-spring deposits. The excursion will begin at Bendricks Rock – Hayes Point where we will see dinosaur footprints, evaporate dissolution collapse structures and palaeosoils. Total walking distance about 1Km. We will then drive to The Captains Wife car park at Swanbridge and in the afternoon visit the Carboniferous – Triassic unconformity on Sully Island, where replaced evaporates and a variety of other lacustrine facies occur. Total walking distance here about 2Km.


Sunday





Mammal teeth in Jurassic Skye

"King" of Jurassic Scotland?

The Guardian reports on the finding of a jaw of Wareolestes rex on the Isle of Skye. This creature was a mammal and was found in Middle Jurassic sediment.

The article includes a discussion of early mammal evolution, particularly teeth.


Bristol looks at ancient Chinese fossils

"World's Oldest Animal Fossils"

The Bristol Earth Sciences Department has been involved the study of ancient, Pre-Cambrian fossils from Southern China which may be the earliest examples of animal remains so far found. you can read all about it HERE.

A spiny acritarch from the Doushantuo biota