Saturday, 18 November 2017

Next week 20th to 26th November 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS
20th to 26th November 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


All Week (except Monday)

10:00
 Bristol City Museum - Pliosaurus!
WhenSun, 13 August, 10:00 – 17:00
WhereBristol Museum & Art Gallery (map)
DescriptionTravel back in time 150 million years and dive into Bristol’s Jurassic seas.


  
Monday 20th

Dave Green - The Devonian Period
When
Mon, 20 November, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Devonian Period 419 to 358 million years ago, this period (whose existence was hotly disputed by Sedgwick and Murchison in the 1820s and 30s) saw the amalgamation of two parts of Britain (but strangely not including Devon!), the emergence of widespread land vegetation, closely followed by insects and terrestrial tetrapods. A major extinction, of disputed origin, wiped out a large proportion of life towards the end of the period. Half the world consisted of a vast ocean (Panthalassa), which, like the modern Pacific, was gradually being destroyed by subduction, in favour of the Rheic and PalaeoTethyian Oceans. Starts Mon 18th September for 10 weeks (not 16th or 23rd Oct), until 4th December Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70 (including tea, coffee etc at breaktime!).

Contact Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Forge Hill, Lydbrook, Glos GL17 9QU Tel 01594 860858
davegeostudies@gmail.com


Tuesday 21st

Geol Soc Western
When
Tue, 21 November, 18:00 – 21:00
Where
The Hub, Aztec West (map)
Description
Malcolm Brown, President of the Geological Society

Risk and Uncertainty in the Exploration for Oil and Gas

"18:00 to 18:30 - networking and refreshments
18:30 to 19:30 - Lecture
19:30 - Questions"

SMFS Evening Meeting
When
Tue, 21 November, 19:30 – 22:00
Where
Friends’ Meeting House, Ordnance Road, Southampton, SO15 2AZ (map)
Description
 “Mining Emeralds – where to go and how to find them” Presentation by Rob Bowell.

Members’ Display Table: Precious and semi-precious minerals.

Wednesday 22nd




Thursday 23rd




Friday 24th




Saturday 25th

OUGS Severnside - Day of Lectures
When
Saturday, 25 Nov 2017
Where
National Museum of Wales, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NP (map)
Description
Day of Lectures
Leader: Jan Ashton-Jones
Venue: National Museum of Wales, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NP
Date: November 25th 2017 (Saturday)
Type: Day of Talks
Summary: Our annual Day of Lectures will be held in the Oriel Suite of the museum.

Amateur Geological Society - Mineral Gem and Fossil Show
When
Sat, 25 November, 10:00 – 16:00
Where
Trinity Church, 15 Nether St, London N12 7NN, UK (map)
Description
Full details at https://amgeosoc.wordpress.com

Sunday 26th






Serendipitous palaeontology

Finding Ediacaran Fossils

This article describes fossil hunting for Ediacaran fossils and also gives an introduction to their importance. Apparently Ediacaran fossil hunting depends mainly on luck and having the sun low in the sky! If you have access you can read the full academic paper HERE.

The image of a rock from Nevada shows several fossil casts and moulds, marked by white arrows. All are examples of the elusive Ediacaran biota. Scale bar is 5 centimeters. Credit: Emmy Smith
Some of the specimens are, shall we say, unspectacular - see below. 



Saturday, 11 November 2017

Next week 13th to 19th November 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS
13th to 19th November 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


All Week (except Monday)

10:00
 Bristol City Museum - Pliosaurus!
WhenSun, 13 August, 10:00 – 17:00
WhereBristol Museum & Art Gallery (map)
DescriptionTravel back in time 150 million years and dive into Bristol’s Jurassic seas. We dare you to come face to face with one very special creature – an eight metre long Pliosaurus called Doris. She’s the ultimate predator and you’ll be awestruck as you touch her skin, listen to her heartbeat and smell her disgusting breath! Then travel forward to the present day to find out more about this amazing beast. See her actual fossil – one of the world’s most complete – and play games to discover more about her life and death. All the family can have fun investigating the science that helped us bring her back to life. Ideal for children aged 3-11 years old. Discovered in Westbury, Wiltshire in 1994, our internationally significant specimen is the world’s only example of a new species of pliosaur – Pliosaurus carpenteri – and will be on public display for the first time. Pliosaurs are so big that it took ten years to prepare all the fossils that were found. Bristol Museum & Art Gallery opening times: Tue-Sun: 10am-5pm Closed Mondays except Bank Holiday Mondays and Mondays during Bristol school holidays: 10am-5pm


  
Monday 13th

Teme Valley Geological Society Lecture - The Coal Measures of Martley and Newent
When
Mon, 13 November, 10:00 – 11:00
Where
Martley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
Description
The Coal Measures of Martley and
Newent, by Dr Bernard Besly

Contact Janet 01886 821061 for the correct time


Dave Green - The Devonian Period
When
Mon, 13 November, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Devonian Period 419 to 358 million years ago, this period (whose existence was hotly disputed by Sedgwick and Murchison in the 1820s and 30s) saw the amalgamation of two parts of Britain (but strangely not including Devon!), the emergence of widespread land vegetation, closely followed by insects and terrestrial tetrapods. A major extinction, of disputed origin, wiped out a large proportion of life towards the end of the period. Half the world consisted of a vast ocean (Panthalassa), which, like the modern Pacific, was gradually being destroyed by subduction, in favour of the Rheic and PalaeoTethyian Oceans. Starts Mon 18th September for 10 weeks (not 16th or 23rd Oct), until 4th December Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70 (including tea, coffee etc at breaktime!).

Contact Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Forge Hill, Lydbrook, Glos GL17 9QU Tel 01594 860858
davegeostudies@gmail.com

Tuesday 14th

Note that the WEGA Lecture is TOMORROW!


Wednesday 15th


WEGA Lecture
When
Wed, 15 November, 19:30 – 21:00
Where
Earth Sciences Lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, University of Bristol. (map)
Description
Italian Volcanoes, Lecture by Dr. Lidia Lonergan (Imperial College)

The Geology and Scenery of Italy: the Role of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonic Plates
Lidia Lonergan, Department of Earth Sciences, Imperial College London
This talk will illustrate how the theory of plate tectonics allows us to understand the main elements of the geology of Italy. The collision between the African and European plates, which started about 100 million years ago, is responsible for the growth of the impressive Alpine mountain chain and the Apennines that form the modern backbone of the Italian peninsula. The formation and evolution of these mountain chains is intimately related to the their adjacent low-lying Po and Adriatic plains. The subduction of an ancient ocean- Tethys (of which today’s Mediterranean is partly a remnant) also plays a role in tectonic history and can explain the volcanoes of the Aeolian Islands and Mount Etna. The active geological history continues today; Italy still lies along the African-Eurasian plate boundary. Africa continues to move closer to Europe at a rate of 8 mm per year closing the Mediterranean in its grip.  As a result Italy is subject to ongoing earthquake and volcanic activity. I hope to show how an appreciation of the tectonics and internal forces of our planet may enrich your appreciation of the spectacular and varied scenery of Italy from the majestic pinnacles of the Dolomites to the barren lunar landscape of Vesuvius or Etna.


Thursday 16th


Thornbury Geology Group meeting
When
Thu, 16 November, 19:30 – 20:30
Description
 Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882
The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. 
Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. 
The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. 
Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee


Friday 17th




Saturday 18th


Sussex Mineral Show
When
Sat, 18 November, 10:00 – 16:30
Where
Clair Hall, Haywards Heath, West Sussex. (map)



Sunday 19th





Friday, 10 November 2017

Unlucky dinosaurs

Where the Asteroid Struck was the Worst Possible Place

This article discusses the after affects of the asteroid impact 66m years ago, near the Yucatan Peninsula. The dust and soot cloud was the killer. It was previously thought that much of the soot came from forest fires. But the rocks struck were particularly rich in hydrocarbons (and sulphate containing gypsum). Thus the soot was very fine and hydrocarbon rich. The result was "nuclear winter" and acid rain. And the extinction of the dinosaurs and an opportunity for mammals.

Much of this was known before but the authors suggest that if the asteroid had struck elsewhere the results would have been less catastrophic. 

Obligatory dinosaur picture


Geomagnetic spike

What does a 3,000 year old "Geomagnetic Spike" tell us?

Studies of ancient slag heaps show that the magnetic field varied in strength by 100% over a 30 year period. But only in a small area centred on Jordan.

Strength of Earth's magnetic field in 2010 (left) and 1000BCE (right)

This article discusses this and speculates about what was happening in the core and whether it could happen again and the likely consequences. 

Friday, 3 November 2017

Next week 6th to 12th November 2017


NEXT WEEKS EVENTS
6th to 12th November 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


All Week (except Monday)

10:00
 Bristol City Museum - Pliosaurus!
WhenSun, 13 August, 10:00 – 17:00
WhereBristol Museum & Art Gallery (map)
DescriptionTravel back in time 150 million years and dive into Bristol’s Jurassic seas. We dare you to come face to face with one very special creature – an eight metre long Pliosaurus called Doris. She’s the ultimate predator and you’ll be awestruck as you touch her skin, listen to her heartbeat and smell her disgusting breath! Then travel forward to the present day to find out more about this amazing beast. See her actual fossil – one of the world’s most complete – and play games to discover more about her life and death. All the family can have fun investigating the science that helped us bring her back to life. Ideal for children aged 3-11 years old. Discovered in Westbury, Wiltshire in 1994, our internationally significant specimen is the world’s only example of a new species of pliosaur – Pliosaurus carpenteri – and will be on public display for the first time. Pliosaurs are so big that it took ten years to prepare all the fossils that were found. Bristol Museum & Art Gallery opening times: Tue-Sun: 10am-5pm Closed Mondays except Bank Holiday Mondays and Mondays during Bristol school holidays: 10am-5pm


  
Monday 6th

Dave Green - The Devonian Period
When
Mon, 6 November, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Devonian Period 419 to 358 million years ago, this period (whose existence was hotly disputed by Sedgwick and Murchison in the 1820s and 30s) saw the amalgamation of two parts of Britain (but strangely not including Devon!), the emergence of widespread land vegetation, closely followed by insects and terrestrial tetrapods. A major extinction, of disputed origin, wiped out a large proportion of life towards the end of the period. Half the world consisted of a vast ocean (Panthalassa), which, like the modern Pacific, was gradually being destroyed by subduction, in favour of the Rheic and PalaeoTethyian Oceans. Starts Mon 18th September for 10 weeks (not 16th or 23rd Oct), until 4th December Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays. Cost £70 (including tea, coffee etc at breaktime!).

Contact Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Forge Hill, Lydbrook, Glos GL17 9QU Tel 01594 860858
davegeostudies@gmail.com


Tuesday 7th



Wednesday 8th




Thursday 9th




Friday 10th

When
Fri, 10 November, 18:00 – 19:00
Where
Anson Rooms, Students Union, Queens Road, Bristol, United Kingdom (map)
Description
Richmond Lectures: Richard Fortey

***This event is being hosted in collaboration with DinoSoc***
 
Richard Fortey tells of the adventures and misadventures he experienced during his working life at The Natural History Museum, as he travelled the world in search of long-extinct trilobites. His books and television series draw on a long life as a naturalist and palaeontologist.

Book now (free tickets): https://www.bristolsu.org.uk/events/richmond-lectures-richard-fortey/buy_ticket


Saturday 11th




Sunday 12th






Richard Fortey

Richmond Lectures: Richard Fortey

I have been asked to publicise this:

***This event is being hosted in collaboration with DinoSoc***

Anson Room, Students' Union
 
Richard Fortey tells of the adventures and misadventures he experienced during his working life at The Natural History Museum, as he travelled the world in search of long-extinct trilobites. His books and television series draw on a long life as a naturalist and palaeontologist.
Venue/Timing
Venue : Richmond Lectures
Type: Richmond Lectures
Start Date: Friday 10-11-2017 - 18:00
End Date: Friday 10-11-2017 - 19:00

Book Offer

Smith and Murchison - Book Offer

I received this today from John Morton BSc FGS. I am sure some of you will be interested.

I wonder if your any of your readers would be interested in my biographies of William Smith (Strata) and Roderick Murchison (King of Siluria).  I can offer them post free.  I attach fliers describing the books.  
As I am sure you are aware, William Smith, among many other achievements, was the Resident Engineer of the Somersetshire Coal Canal and my book includes details of his house at Tucking Mill and the remains of the canal which can still be visited.
Roderick Murchison has family connections in Bathampton (Memorial in the church)..

Here are the fliers.
-----------------------------------

Festival of Geology

Festival of Geology

I wont be able to go to this but here is the programme

SATURDAY 4TH NOVEMBER PLEASE JOIN US AT THIS CELEBRATION OF GEOLOGY

DISCOVERY ROOM: Full of activities for children including, fossil making, shifting sharks teeth, microfossil activities and dinosaur workshops.

Lectures in the Darwin Lecture Theatre
11.30–12.15     Dr Susannah Maidment:  How to weigh a dinosaur
12.30–1.15       Professor Chris Jackson: Hot Rocks Under Our Feet: What can we learn about Volcanism from X-raying Earth?
2.00–2.15 Presentation to the Winners of the Photographic Competition by the GA President.    Entries on  display all day in the Haldane Room.

I'm sorry I wont be in London to get my Highly Commended award for this photo of Horseshoe Bend, Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah. But if you get the GA Calendar you will see it as the photo for October

2.15–2.00  Professor Iain Stewart:  Hot Rocks: The Fall and Rise of UK Geothermal Energy                                                 
3.15–4.00   Professor Lidunka Vocadlo Core! What a scorcher! Hot and squashed in the centre of the Earth 
A Guided Walk 11.00 - 12.00 The Geology of UCL  around the Bloomsbury Campus - led by Dr Wendy Kirk
SUNDAY 5TH NOVEMBER
Field trips to Riddlesdown Quarry, Building Stones Walk Central London, Route of HS2 Misbourne Valley
Follow this link to book on any of these trips https://geologistsassociation.org.uk/festival.html#walksSATURDAY 4TH NOVEMBER PLEASE JOIN US AT THIS CELEBRATION OF GEOLOGY


Predicting eruptions

Why Predicting Eruptions is Difficult and How to Improve It.

This long article, using Yellowstone as an example, describes current eruption prediction (earthquakes, ground deformation, gas discharge) and suggests better methods involving geophysics, (seismic tomography) and petrology (geospeedometry). And scientific drilling. 

I had never come across the term geospeedometry before and the thought of drilling into a magma chamber gives this retired drilling engineer the willies! So I read the article and it is very interesting. 

Apparently magma drilling "requires cooling the rock in front of the drill bit to quench a narrow cylinder of melt so that it can be further penetrated." What would you use? A liquid which did not vaporise? I will need to research this further.

There is a lot more of interest in the article - well worth reading.

Schematic diagram of the magmatic system beneath Yellowstone caldera (~50 kilometers in diameter). Tomographic studies estimate 5% to 15% melt within the upper silicic magma reservoir. Red dots are earthquake hypocenters. Credit: Modified from Lowenstern and Hurwitz [2008]

Photomicrograph of sanidine from California’s Inyo Domes illustrating sharp growth zones. These zones track different episodes in the evolution of the magma surrounding these crystals as they grew. Credit: N. Matthews and J. Vazquez, USGS