Saturday, 19 August 2017

Next week 21st to 27th August 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 21st to 27th August 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


All Week (except Monday)

10:00
 Bristol City Museum - Pliosaurus!
WhenSun, 13 August, 10:00 – 17:00
WhereBristol Museum & Art Gallery (map)
DescriptionTravel back in time 150 million years and dive into Bristol’s Jurassic seas. We dare you to come face to face with one very special creature – an eight metre long Pliosaurus called Doris. She’s the ultimate predator and you’ll be awestruck as you touch her skin, listen to her heartbeat and smell her disgusting breath! Then travel forward to the present day to find out more about this amazing beast. See her actual fossil – one of the world’s most complete – and play games to discover more about her life and death. All the family can have fun investigating the science that helped us bring her back to life. Ideal for children aged 3-11 years old. Discovered in Westbury, Wiltshire in 1994, our internationally significant specimen is the world’s only example of a new species of pliosaur – Pliosaurus carpenteri – and will be on public display for the first time. Pliosaurs are so big that it took ten years to prepare all the fossils that were found. Bristol Museum & Art Gallery opening times: Tue-Sun: 10am-5pm Closed Mondays except Bank Holiday Mondays and Mondays during Bristol school holidays: 10am-5pm

Monday

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 21 August, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318

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Sunday




Women and others and fossils

Does Palaeontology have an Image Problem?

Studying at Aberdeen where (and when) we didn't really do fossils, palaeontology's image, if it ever occurred to me, was mixed up with sediments and other aspects of gardening! Igneous and metamorphic petrology was where geology should be. 

But wider experience has had its affect and one now accepts that fossils and sediments are valid areas of study. So this article in the Guardian is a further step in my education. 

I suspect that your opinion will mirror that of the comments which follow the article - its extremely important or its something about nothing. It may have been important once but it will be sort itself out soon or something must be done.

Thankfully I don't need to do anything - I will continue to talk to all sorts of geologists

The stereotype of the fossil prospecting man in the desert is hard to shake. Photograph: Dave Reede/Getty Images/First Light

Friday, 18 August 2017

A tale of Ice and Fire

Wild Fires in Greenland

This article discusses the increasing number of wildfires in Greenland.

The fear is that global warming is reducing the thickness of permafrost and thus increasing the amount of peat exposed and available to burn. Also black carbon released by the burning may cover permanent snow and ice and therefore increase melting by boosting its heat absorption.

In southern Greenland, a fire that could be fueled by degraded permafrost burns 150 kilometers northeast of Sisimiut, the second-largest city in the territory. Officials aren’t sure how the fire started or when it might end. This 8 August image was captured by a European Space Agency satellite in natural colors with highlights from near infrared and shortwave infrared imaging. Credit: ESA/Pierre Markuse, CC BY 2.0

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Next week 14th to 20th August 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 14th to 20th August 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


All Week (except Monday)

10:00
 Bristol City Museum - Pliosaurus!
WhenSun, 13 August, 10:00 – 17:00
WhereBristol Museum & Art Gallery (map)
DescriptionTravel back in time 150 million years and dive into Bristol’s Jurassic seas. We dare you to come face to face with one very special creature – an eight metre long Pliosaurus called Doris. She’s the ultimate predator and you’ll be awestruck as you touch her skin, listen to her heartbeat and smell her disgusting breath! Then travel forward to the present day to find out more about this amazing beast. See her actual fossil – one of the world’s most complete – and play games to discover more about her life and death. All the family can have fun investigating the science that helped us bring her back to life. Ideal for children aged 3-11 years old. Discovered in Westbury, Wiltshire in 1994, our internationally significant specimen is the world’s only example of a new species of pliosaur – Pliosaurus carpenteri – and will be on public display for the first time. Pliosaurs are so big that it took ten years to prepare all the fossils that were found. Bristol Museum & Art Gallery opening times: Tue-Sun: 10am-5pm Closed Mondays except Bank Holiday Mondays and Mondays during Bristol school holidays: 10am-5pm

Monday

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 14 August, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318

Tuesday

19:30
 SMFS Evening Meeting
WhenTue, 15 August, 19:30 – 22:00
WhereFriends’ Meeting House, Ordnance Road, Southampton, SO15 2AZ (map)
DescriptionAnnual Swap & Sale Evening. Bring along unwanted minerals, fossils, rocks, books, anything of geological interest, to exchange or sell.

Wednesday



Thursday

19:30
 Thornbury Geology Group meeting
WhenThu, 17 August, 19:30 – 20:30
Description Thornbury Geology Group, The Chantry, Thornbury, 7.30pm, contact 01454 416882 The group is is an offshoot of Thornbury and District Museum and we welcome new members. Previous geological knowledge can be helpful but is not necessary as members are very willing to share their own knowledge with anyone keen to learn more about Earth Science. The group is loosely following a pre-recorded lecture series which is supplemented by use of other material and geological specimens. On occasions a guest speaker will talk on their specialist topic. Costs are met from attending members' monthly contributions and the group does not have membership subscriptions or a committee

Friday



Saturday

SWGA Field Trip - The Old Red Sandstone of the Ruperra area near Cardiff
WhenSaturday, 19 Aug 2017
WhereMeet at 10:30 am at Coed Llwyncelyn car park, near Rudry (ST 202 854) (map)
DescriptionThe Old Red Sandstone of the Ruperra area near Cardiff Leaders: Tom Sharpe and John Davies

14:00
 Wiltshire Museum event: GUIDED GEOLOGY WALK
WhenSat, 19 August, 14:00 – 17:00
WhereWindmill Hill: ST 872 311 (map)
DescriptionA 4 mile (3 hour) walk led by Isobel Geddes (along footpaths, tracks & lanes) looking at geology, landscape and building stones. The varied geology with steeply dipping rocks makes the terrain hilly but there is a spectacular view over the Stour valley. Meet Saturday 19th August 2017 at 2 pm. at Windmill Hill: ST 872 311. Stout footwear, protective clothing to suit the prevailing weather conditions and reasonable mobility will be required (participants must be able to walk at least four miles at a reasonable pace). Walk includes a steep hill and is expected to take about 2.5 hours.

Sunday




Weighing titanosaurs

Patagotitan mayorum - how much did it weigh?

A lot! But science needs a bit more accuracy than that, so this article discusses how to estimate the weight of the largest titanosaur found so far. And comes to no very definite conclusion. It is thought to be 8 to 18% heavier than Argentinosaurus hiunculensis (the previous largest dinosaur) which is thought to have weighed 73 tons.


Patagotitan reconstruction
And you can practise your Spanish comprehension by listening to the video!

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Tolkien - not a geologist!

Middle Earth - a Geological Nightmare!

Tolkien's Middle Earth does not make geological sense
This article discusses the authors hangups with the map in "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings". He gets quite upset about it - but not as much as the people who comment on him!

I doubt that Tolkien would be much bothered.

Saturday, 5 August 2017

Next week 7th to 13th August 2017

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

 7th to 13th August 2017

The following is an extract from Bristol Geology Calendar

More details can be found in the Calendar and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.


Monday

18:00
 Teme Valley Geol Soc - Geological Amble
WhenMon, 7 August, 18:00 – 21:00
WhereMartley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
DescriptionA series of 6 weekly Geo-Ambles with John Nicklin Contact 01886 888318

Tuesday



Wednesday



Thursday



Friday



Saturday



Sunday