Saturday, 24 February 2018

26th February to 4th March 2018

NEXT WEEKS EVENTS
26th February to 4th March 2018

The following is an extract from Bristol and West Country Geology Calendars

More details can be found in the Bristol and the West Country Calendars and on the web sites of the relevant Society or organisation.

  
Monday 26th


Dave Green - The Geology of Norway (and Scandinavia)
When
Mon, 26 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
Scandinavia forms a large part of the ancient continent of Baltica. Although once extensively covered by Phanerozoic rocks, these have been largely eroded apart from those preserved in downfaulted graben (as in the North Sea and Oslo) and upththrust nappes, pushed onto Baltica during the violent collision with Laurentia in the Caledonian Orogeny at the end of the Silurian. Otherwise, Scandinavia is composed of PreCambrian rocks (mainly igneous and metamorphic) accreted to Baltica during its formation, from 3500 to 900 million years ago. The course aims to introduce you to this long and fascinating history. Monday 8th for 10 weeks (not 12h or 19th Feb) until 26th March. Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30-9.30pm on Mondays . Cost £70
Contact Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Forge Hill, Lydbrook, Glos GL17 9QU Tel 01594 860858
davegeostudies@gmail.com


Tuesday 27th




Wednesday 28th

Geol Soc Western - Schools Geology Competition
When
Wednesday, 28 Feb 2018
Where
Host School (map)
Description
Schools Competition

Time and venue:- TBC
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Bristol Nats Event
When
Wed, 28 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building (map)
Description
VISIT TO UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL GEOLOGY COLLECTION
Claudia Hildebrandt
Wednesday 28 February 2018, 7.30 p.m.
Claudia Hildebrandt has kindly offered to show members of the BNS round the Geology Collection of the School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol.
It will be a very interesting evening. Please meet in the area behind the double glass doors at the entrance to the School of Earth Sciences.


Thursday 1st

Dave Green - Mountain Building
When
Thu, 1 March, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury (map)
Description
This 10 week course aims to introduce you to the geological processes that produce mountains, mainly by the study of different examples, both past (e.g. the Caledonian and Variscan belts) and present (e.g. the Alps and Andes). This includes the classic collisional orogenies, such as the Himalayas, Urals and Pyrenees; the accretionary orogenies, such as Taiwan, the Southern Uplands and the Andes; but also mountain ranges produced by very different tectonic forces, such as the East African Highlands, the Cantabrian Range and the Scottish Highlands. Held at The Chantry, Thornbury. First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 11th January until March 22nd (not Thurs 15th Feb) in the ?TBA Room.Cost £75
February 2018

Contact Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Forge Hill, Lydbrook, Glos GL17 9QU Tel 01594 860858
davegeostudies@gmail.com
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Bath Geol Soc - Lecture
When
Thu, 1 March, 19:30 – 21:00
Where
Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, 16 Queen Square, Bath (map)
Description
Finding new uses for old pollen: reconstructing past climate and vegetation change using pollen chemistry

Dr Philip Jardine, University of M√ľnster

Due to their widespread and abundant fossil record, pollen and spores have become a mainstay of research into past vegetation change and floral evolution, and are widely used to infer past climates and date sedimentary sequences. However, palynology as a discipline has remained largely unchanged in its approach for the last 100 years. In this talk I’ll describe how a whole new field of research is opening up, based on using the chemical signature of pollen and spores to extract previously inaccessible information on past climate and vegetation change.

One key insight has been that pollen and spores contain a direct chemical record of past ultraviolet irradiance via concentrations of ‘sunscreen’ compounds, offering the potential to quantify the role of solar irradiance in climate change, identify episodes of past ozone collapse, and determine the timing and rate of mountain uplift. Another has been the discovery of a taxonomic signature in pollen and spore chemistry, greatly increasing the amount of information on plant composition and diversity that can be recovered from palynological samples. I’ll talk about recent developments in both of these areas, and offer some thoughts on the future direction of chemical palynology.


Friday 2nd



Saturday 3rd

Nick Chidlaw - Understanding Geological Maps
When
3 – 4 Mar 2018
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury, in South Gloucestershire. (map)


Sunday 4th

Nick Chidlaw - Understanding Geological Maps
When
3 – 4 Mar 2018
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury, in South Gloucestershire. (map)



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