Saturday, 15 February 2020

17th February to 1st March 2020


NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

17th February to 1st March 2020


THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.


MONDAY 17TH

Geostudies Field Course - Mallorca
When
17– 24 Feb 2020
Description

The Geology of  Mallorca 

 Mallorca  is an extension of the Alpine range of the Betic Cordillera. Rocks ranging in age from the Carboniferous to  the Pleistocene are mainly sedimentary and have been severely affected by thrusting and folding during the Miocene, producing two ranges of mountains – the Sierra  Norte and Sierra de Levante, separated by a fault guided valley preserving younger sediments. 

Dave Green, Joys Green Farm, Forge Hill, Lydbrook, Glos GL17 9QU  Tel 01594 860858   
e-mail davegeostudies@gmail.com 

tuesday 18th

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA
------------------------------

Geol Soc Western - Lecture
When
Tue, 18 February, 18:00 – 20:00
Where
The Hub, 500 Park Ave, Aztec W, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4TR, UK (map)
Description
Talk - The Engineering Geology and Geomorphology of Hot Deserts by Professor Jim Griffiths, Plymouth University  

The Western Regional Group is pleased to welcome Professor James Griffiths, Emeritus Professor of 
Engineering Geology & Geomorphology, University of Plymouth. Jim received the prestigious Glossop Medal 
from the Geological Society in 2013 and has over 15 years’ industry experience and over 20 years in 
academia working in geology and geomorphology.  

Over the past 40 years considerable understanding and experience has been gained of the 
geomorphological processes and ground characteristics peculiar to hot desert regions, and the effects these 
have on engineering design and construction. This work was summarized by Engineering Group Working 
Party on Hot Deserts in EGSP 25 (Walker 2012). The Working Party brought together a team of practicing 
engineering geologists, applied geomorphologists, geotechnical and civil engineers with a wealth of varied 
but complimentary experience of working in hot deserts. The report covered: desert environments; processes 
and landforms; hazards and the desert ground model; soil and rock description and characteristics; site investigation; engineering  behaviour of desert soils; construction  materials; and engineering design and  construction.   

This presentation will be on the engineering  geological and geomorphological aspects of  hot deserts conditions and the way these  disciplines inform engineering design. The  presentation will be by Professor Griffiths who  co-authored three of the ten chapters in the  report and will draw on the all aspects of the  findings of the Working Party.  

Walker, M.J., (ed.) 2012. Hot Desert Engineering Geology and Geomorphology.  
Geological Society Engineering Geology Special Publication, 25, pp.424. 

wednesday 19th

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA

thursday 20th

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA
-------------------------------------

Thornbury Geology Group, 7.30pm, The Chantry, Thornbury
When
Thu, 20 February, 19:00 – 21:30
Description
Thornbury Geology Group, 7.30pm at The Chantry, Thornbury, and every 3rd Thursday in the month.  

friday 21st

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA

saturday 22nd

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA

sunday 23rd

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA

monday 24th

GEOSTUDIES FIELD COURSE - MALLORCA
----------------------------

Geostudies Lecture Course - Germany
When
Mon, 24 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Geology of Germany 

 Monday 13th for 10 weeks (not 17th Feb) until 23rd  March. Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30 - 9.30pm on Mondays. 

Like Britain, Germany consists of a number of exotic Terranes, derived from different continents and amalgamated together by plate tectonic collisions. Northern Germany is part of Avalonia, which amalgamated with the East European Craton (Baltica) along the Tornquist suture in the east. A great deal of this area is plastered by thick Quaternary glacial sediments. 

Central Germany is part of Armorica, which collided with the north during the Variscan orogeny. There is, in places, thick Mesozoic unconformable cover. The extreme south is part of the Alpine orogeny, but its effects were transmitted northwards to affect and reactivate older structures. There was extensive volcanic activity during the Tertiary, and some famous asteroid impact sites. 

Cost £75

tuesday 25th


wednesday 26th

Bristol Nats Lecture
When
Wed, 26 February, 19:30 – 21:00
Where
Room 1.5 Wills Memorial Building, University of Bristol (map)
Description
Trains and Trilobites
Talk by David Clegg
Geological journeys in Canada including the Burgess Shale

thursday 27th

Geostudies Lecture - Uniformitarianism
When
 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury (map)
Description

The Limits of Uniformitarianism.


The science of geology is heavily dependent on the principle of uniformitarianism – the idea  that geological conditions and processes have remained substantially unchanged through geological time, meaning that we can interpret the past on the basis of our understanding of the geological present. But how accurate is this principle? To what extent were conditions and processes different in the past? Are present conditions and processes typical? How well do we understand present processes? And there are also spatial features to consider; A casual examination of a modern sedimentary or volcanic environment reveals rapid and wide-ranging changes in facies over a small area. Our evidence of past environments is largely based on small, possibly unrepresentative, exposures of tiny fractions of those past environments. Are we justified in using evidence from the past to interpret the present and future, such as climate change?  Held at The Chantry, Thornbury, in the Hanover Room.  First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 16th  January until April 2nd  (not Thurs 20th Feb or 19th March). Cost £75


Programme

What do we mean by Uniformitarianism? Origin of the term and the historical context in which it arose and developed as a counter to “Old” Catastrophism.

What are the main problems with Uniformitarianism? The rise of “New” Catastrophism in the later part of the 20th century. Problems of direction, cyclicity, punctuation, gradualism in the following fields of geology:

Uniformitarianism and sedimentation. Have conditions changed over geological time? How representative in terms of coverage and completeness is the sedimentary record?

Uniformitarianism and volcanicity, earthquakes, intrusion and landslides (Mar 13)

Uniformitarianism and the solar system – external processes affecting earth geology (Mar 27)

Uniformitarianism and major environmental change (such as climate and sea level changes) (Mar 5)

Uniformitarianism, evolution and mass extinction (Mar 12)

Uniformitarianism and tectonics – was plate tectonics a relatively young development? Is the Wilson (supercontinent) Cycle real? (Mar 26)

Geomorphology and Uniformitarianism (Apr 2)

Is the present the key to the past? (or in reverse?)

friday 28th


saturday 29th

Bath Geol Soc - Field Trip
When
Sat, 29 February, 10:30 – 12:00
Where
Brown's Folly Car Park (G.R. ST 798663) (map)
Description
Brown's Folly Nature Reserve
Leader: Graham Hickman, Bath Geological Society
The annual, morning clear-up of the Great oolite exposures on the SSSI reserve near Bathford. Bring your secateurs and hedge trimmers to cut back the vegetation and clean up the outcrops, or just take the opportunity to visit the sites and talk about geology.

Meet at 10.30 a.m. at Brown's Folly Car Park (G.R. ST 798663). Strong boots, waterproofs and hard hats are required.

sunday 1st



How to find air composition a VERY long time ago.

How to Analyse Air a VERY Long Time Ago.

THIS ARTICLE introduces a couple of papers which use an unusual technique for finding the composition of the atmosphere before it became oxygen rich.

The article rehearses various reasons to think that the atmosphere was CO
rich and oxygen to be virtually absent. But putting numbers to this has, so far, been impossible.

One way to estimate the atmospheric composition is the chemical reaction of minerals with the atmosphere. And the most spectacular of these reactions is when a meteorite passes through the atmosphere. 

And it is this which is the subject of the two papers discussed. And they come to broadly similar results. One estimates a CO₂ content of 64% and a temperature of 30ºC, the other 25 to 50% and a temperature somewhat cooler.

The micrometeorites were pure iron ones, collected from 2.7Ga old sediments from the Pilbara of Western Australia, veneered with magnetite (Fe₃O₄) and wűstite (FeO). This veneer records their passage through the ancient atmosphere. You could get a similar surface coating from a passage through today's oxygen rich atmosphere. But we know that oxygen was virtually absent; CO₂ is the only viable candidate.

HERE is another article reviewing the same material but with a nice movie of a micrometeorite falling to Earth. 

Unfortunately none of the sources tell us where and how the micrometeorites were found and identified.

Saturday, 8 February 2020

10th to 16th February 2020


NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

10th to 16th February 2020


THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.


MONDAY 10th


Geostudies Lecture Course - Germany
When
Mon, 10 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Geology of Germany 

 Monday 13th for 10 weeks (not 17th Feb) until 23rd  March. Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30 - 9.30pm on Mondays. 

Like Britain, Germany consists of a number of exotic Terranes, derived from different continents and amalgamated together by plate tectonic collisions. Northern Germany is part of Avalonia, which amalgamated with the East European Craton (Baltica) along the Tornquist suture in the east. A great deal of this area is plastered by thick Quaternary glacial sediments. 

Central Germany is part of Armorica, which collided with the north during the Variscan orogeny. There is, in places, thick Mesozoic unconformable cover. The extreme south is part of the Alpine orogeny, but its effects were transmitted northwards to affect and reactivate older structures. There was extensive volcanic activity during the Tertiary, and some famous asteroid impact sites. 

Cost £75
---------------------------

Teme Valley G S - Lecture
When
Mon, 10 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Martley Memorial Hall B4197 by Sports Ground (map)
Description
Dr Joel Davis, ExoMars – Planetary geology  


tuesday 11th


Cardiff University Lecture - Volcanoes—all you need to know!
When
Tue, 11 February, 18:30 – 20:00
Where
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences will be held in the Wallace Lecture Theatre (0.13), Main Building, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (map)
Description
Predictions of eruptions.   Paul Cole,    University of Plymouth

The 2019-2020 monthly Tuesday evening lecture series in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences will be held in the Wallace Lecture Theatre (0.13), Main Building, Cardiff University, Park Place,
 Cardiff CF10 3AT.  Lectures begin at 18.30.  Booking is not needed.  Should you require the Q&A sessions to be in Welsh, please email edwardsd2@cardiff.ac.uk at least two weeks before the event.

Did you know that the majority of volcanic eruptions – maybe even 90% – occur under water and of which we are largely unaware? There remains a very great deal we don't know about volcanoes, but many exciting new insights are emerging from ongoing research. This lecture series will encompass the diversity of volcanoes, their functioning and products, together with the nature of eruptions and their attendant problems of predictions plus their ensuing past and present environmental and biological impacts.
--------------------------------------


WEGA Lecture - Research Student's Talks
When
Tue, 11 February, 19:30 – 21:00
Where
Earth Sciences Lecture Theatre, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ (map)
Description
Two Bristol Research Students - various topics

wednesday 12th


thursday 13th


Geostudies Lecture - Uniformitarianism
When
Thu, 13 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury (map)
Description

The Limits of Uniformitarianism.


The science of geology is heavily dependent on the principle of uniformitarianism – the idea  that geological conditions and processes have remained substantially unchanged through geological time, meaning that we can interpret the past on the basis of our understanding of the geological present. But how accurate is this principle? To what extent were conditions and processes different in the past? Are present conditions and processes typical? How well do we understand present processes? And there are also spatial features to consider; A casual examination of a modern sedimentary or volcanic environment reveals rapid and wide-ranging changes in facies over a small area. Our evidence of past environments is largely based on small, possibly unrepresentative, exposures of tiny fractions of those past environments. Are we justified in using evidence from the past to interpret the present and future, such as climate change?  Held at The Chantry, Thornbury, in the Hanover Room.  First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 16th  January until April 2nd  (not Thurs 20th Feb or 19th March). Cost £75


Programme

What do we mean by Uniformitarianism? Origin of the term and the historical context in which it arose and developed as a counter to “Old” Catastrophism.

What are the main problems with Uniformitarianism? The rise of “New” Catastrophism in the later part of the 20th century. Problems of direction, cyclicity, punctuation, gradualism in the following fields of geology:

Uniformitarianism and sedimentation. Have conditions changed over geological time? How representative in terms of coverage and completeness is the sedimentary record?

Uniformitarianism and volcanicity, earthquakes, intrusion and landslides

Uniformitarianism and the solar system – external processes affecting earth geology

Uniformitarianism and major environmental change (such as climate and sea level changes)

Uniformitarianism, evolution and mass extinction  

Uniformitarianism and tectonics – was plate tectonics a relatively young development? Is the Wilson (supercontinent) Cycle real?

Geomorphology and Uniformitarianism

Is the present the key to the past? (or in reverse?)

friday 14th


CMGS - Lecture
When
Fri, 14 February, 19:00 – 21:00
Where
Shurdington at The Century Hall (map)
Description
Antarctica and its Treaty

  Our guest speaker is   Dr Joe Angseesing

saturday 15th


South Wales G A - Lecture
When
Sat, 15 February, 11:00 – 12:30
Where
Lectures at Cardiff University are held in the Department of Earth Sciences in the "Main Building". (map)
Description
To be confirmed

sunday16th




Saturday, 1 February 2020

3rd to 9th February 2020


NEXT WEEKS EVENTS

3rd to 9th February 2020


THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM BRISTOL AND WEST COUNTRY GEOLOGY CALENDARS

MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE BRISTOL AND THE WEST COUNTRY CALENDARS AND ON THE WEB SITES OF THE RELEVANT SOCIETY OR ORGANISATION.


MONDAY 3rd

Geostudies Lecture Course - Germany
When
Mon, 3 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester (map)
Description
The Geology of Germany 

 Monday 13th for 10 weeks (not 17th Feb) until 23rd  March. Held at Wynstones School, Stroud Road, Whaddon, Gloucester from 7.30 - 9.30pm on Mondays. 

Like Britain, Germany consists of a number of exotic Terranes, derived from different continents and amalgamated together by plate tectonic collisions. Northern Germany is part of Avalonia, which amalgamated with the East European Craton (Baltica) along the Tornquist suture in the east. A great deal of this area is plastered by thick Quaternary glacial sediments. 

Central Germany is part of Armorica, which collided with the north during the Variscan orogeny. There is, in places, thick Mesozoic unconformable cover. The extreme south is part of the Alpine orogeny, but its effects were transmitted northwards to affect and reactivate older structures. There was extensive volcanic activity during the Tertiary, and some famous asteroid impact sites. 

Cost £75

tuesday 4th


wednesday 5th


thursday 6th

Bath Geol Soc - AGM and Lecture
When
Thu, 6 February, 19:00 – 21:00
Where
16 Queen Square, Bath at the kind invitation of the Bath Royal Literary and Scientfic Institution. (map)
Description
Annual General Meeting, 2019
AGM will start at 7.00 p.m. followed by the lecture at 7.30p.m. Please note that the AGM is for members only. Visitors are welcome to attend the evening's lecture.
Did Ocean Acidification kill off Calcifiers at the end of the Cretaceous?
Prof. Toby Tyrrell, University of Southampton
Ammonites went extinct at the time of the end-Cretaceous asteroid impact, as did more than 90% of species of calcium carbonate-shelled plankton (coccolithophores and foraminifera).Comparable groups not possessing calcium carbonate shells were less severely affected, raising the possibility that ocean acidification, as a side effect of the collision, might have been responsible for the apparent selectivity of the extinctions (calcium carbonate dissolves in even slightly acidic seawater). We investigated whether ocean acidification could have caused the disappearance of the calcifying organisms. I will describe the results of some modelling work we carried out. We simulated various scenarios for how the impact could have produced more acidic seawater (different possible mechanisms from impact to acidity). The results suggest that, although acidification was quite extreme in some scenarios, nevertheless it was probably not the primary reason why so many calcifiers went extinct.
-------------------------------------------------------

Geostudies Lecture - Uniformitarianism
When
Thu, 6 February, 19:30 – 21:30
Where
The Chantry, Thornbury (map)
Description

The Limits of Uniformitarianism.


The science of geology is heavily dependent on the principle of uniformitarianism – the idea  that geological conditions and processes have remained substantially unchanged through geological time, meaning that we can interpret the past on the basis of our understanding of the geological present. But how accurate is this principle? To what extent were conditions and processes different in the past? Are present conditions and processes typical? How well do we understand present processes? And there are also spatial features to consider; A casual examination of a modern sedimentary or volcanic environment reveals rapid and wide-ranging changes in facies over a small area. Our evidence of past environments is largely based on small, possibly unrepresentative, exposures of tiny fractions of those past environments. Are we justified in using evidence from the past to interpret the present and future, such as climate change?  Held at The Chantry, Thornbury, in the Hanover Room.  First meeting 7.30 – 9.30, Thurs 16th  January until April 2nd  (not Thurs 20th Feb or 19th March). Cost £75


Programme

What do we mean by Uniformitarianism? Origin of the term and the historical context in which it arose and developed as a counter to “Old” Catastrophism.

What are the main problems with Uniformitarianism? The rise of “New” Catastrophism in the later part of the 20th century. Problems of direction, cyclicity, punctuation, gradualism in the following fields of geology:

Uniformitarianism and sedimentation. Have conditions changed over geological time? How representative in terms of coverage and completeness is the sedimentary record?

Uniformitarianism and volcanicity, earthquakes, intrusion and landslides

Uniformitarianism and the solar system – external processes affecting earth geology

Uniformitarianism and major environmental change (such as climate and sea level changes)

Uniformitarianism, evolution and mass extinction  

Uniformitarianism and tectonics – was plate tectonics a relatively young development? Is the Wilson (supercontinent) Cycle real?

Geomorphology and Uniformitarianism

Is the present the key to the past? (or in reverse?)

friday 7th


saturday 8th


sunday 9th

OUGS Severnside - AGM and Talks
When
Sun, 9 February, 10:00 – 16:00
Where
: Langstone Village Hall, Old Chepstow Road, Langstone, Newport NP18 2ND, South Wales (map)
Description

Branch Annual General Meeting

Branch AGM followed by a number of short talks from members.

This is a winter social event for our branch members.

Doors open at 10 am, and the AGM itself will start at 11 am. This will include a short presentation describing the various events we held during 2019.

Tea and coffee will be available throughout the day. A buffet lunch will be provided after the AGM, but you are welcome to bring your own packed lunch. Please note that there is no charge for this event.

After lunch we will have a number of short talks from members. We would love to hear from anyone who would like to give a talk about their own geology visits, for example while on holiday. There will be a projector available if you wish to show some photos or provide a short presentation (eg in Powerpoint), although a talk with some rock specimens only would be equally welcome. A talk can be quite brief and should not exceed 15-20 minutes. Please contact Norman (details below) if you would like to share your geological experiences with other members.

The branch library will be available throughout the day and you will be able to borrow geology-related books from its large collection, as well as return any books borrowed previously.

Please let Norman know if you plan to attend (details below) so that we can ensure sufficient food and drink are provided for everyone.